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Gary Graham – ROAD TREKKER



ROAD TREKKER /
WON News Column by Gary Graham

Gary Graham's published credits would fill many pages, two books on saltwater fly fishing, and hundreds of feature articles.

His  current leadership activities in the sportfishing community include: Avalon Tuna Club, member since the 1980s, San Diego Marlin Club, International Game Fish Association (IGFA), Baja California representative; Federation of Fly Fishers (FFF), certified fly casting instructor; Outdoor Writers of California, president; Outdoor Writers of America.

Gary Graham can be reached at: roadtrekker1@gmail.com

Baja Biosphere, bracelets, tuna pens and TIPs
Last weekend I attended the “Let’s Talk Hook-Up” live from the Sportfishing Association of California’s Open House in San Diego. I picked up some valuable information for Baja travelers, which I thought was worth passing on.

In December 2017, a Presidential Decree by Mexico’s President Enrique Peña Nieto established the Pacific Islands Biosphere Reserve, covering 2.7 million acres including 21 islands and 97 islets, plus all the surrounding marine areas.


decreerequires
THE DECREE REQUIRES that every individual on board a fishing vessel entering the Biosphere Reserve area (which includes the Coronado Islands, Todos Santos and San Martin Island) must purchase and wear a bracelet, effective immediately —whether they are fishing or not.


The decree requires that every individual on board a fishing vessel entering the Biosphere Reserve area (which includes the Coronado Islands, Todos Santos, and San Martin Island) must purchase and wear a bracelet, effective immediately — whether they are fishing or not.


The boundaries of the Biosphere reserve: N32 20.000' to N32 29.000', and W117 12.000' to W117 20.000'


Currently, the bracelets are available for purchase at $5 per bracelet per day at Fisherman’s Landing Tackle Shop, Point Loma Sportfishing Tackle Shop and the Dana Landing Market & Fuel Dock. Anglers will be required to provide boat name, boat owner’s name, number of passengers and dates in the reserve areas, but no other special IDs or info is necessary to purchase the bracelets.


While I’m on the subject of Coronado Islands, there are tuna pens around the Coronado Islands and in the northern Baja California waters. The tuna pen aquaculture is the farming of fish by enclosing tuna in man-made pens. These pens are cages that consist of large diameter flotation pipes that hold heavy-duty nets.


It has been discovered that the tuna pens often attract schools of free-roaming tuna. Although this appears to be a good opportunity for anglers to catch those tuna, CONAPESCA reminds all captains, anglers, and vessel owners that Mexico’s Sport Fishing Nom (NOM-017-PESC-1994) prohibits any recreational fishing activities within 250 meters (820 feet) from commercial fishing vessels, and fixed or floating fishing tackle in Mexican waters. This includes tuna pens! Violations will result in legal action taken against the vessel.


While this requirement has been enforced for a while, there may be some who aren’t aware of it.


Also, a reminder about “TIP” (Temporary Import Permit): From 0 to 12 miles from shore, a TIP is required; beyond 12 miles, it is not. The cost for the TIP that is good for 10 years is around $55 depending on inflation rate in the Mexican peso.


First, a Temporary Import Permit must be obtained. They are not expensive and can be obtained via the Mexican Consulate Office closest to you, at the border from the CIITEV unit in the Customs Office of entry or through this page on this Mexican Government link:

www.sportfishinginmexico.com/customs/


Documents required to obtain a TIP are:


1. Original current vessel documentation or registration that proves ownership;


2. Applicant’s ID (Passport);


3. For vessels registered under a Corporation or LLC, a notarized letter to authorize the vessel operation master operating it.


A word of caution, if a boat is purchased in Mexico and already has the permit, the TIP must be transferred or cancelled by the former owner.


The payment on the website may only be made via an international credit card in the name of the importer. Remember to call your bank or credit card company to inform them you plan to make an international transaction. These Temporary Import Permits are valid for 10 years from the effective date of the temporary importation of the vessel. A TIP can be renewed for another 10 years if the application is completed 45 days prior to the expiration of the past permit.


Once a TIP has been obtained for a vessel, some form of an FMM (Formato Migratoria Multiple) is needed for everyone on board. The most common immigration document for visitors is the Tourist Card, which can be easily obtained at the Point of Entry and costs $16 USD depending on the Mexican peso inflation rate. A tourist may also obtain an FMM via the SAC Website: www.californiasportfishing.org/fmm-visitor-form .


Along with the immigration document, the captain must report entering and exiting Mexico with a passenger list and copies of their individual immigration ­documents. If this is done online, both the passenger list and payment receipt must be e-mailed to: bc_pescade

portiva@inami.gob.mx


Applicants will receive an e-mail from National Immi­gration Institute (INM) either authorizing the trip or denying entry to a passenger intending to enter Mexico’s territorial water onboard the given vessel.


The authorizing e-mail should contain a National ­Immigration Institute (INM)’s permit to enter as a ­“Visitor without Permission to Perform Paid Activities.” The length of stay will cover the amount of time requested in the application yet shall not exceed 180 days, nor may it be used for multiple entries and departures.


A copy of this information will be sent to the Secretary of the Navy (SEMAR) and to the Secretary of ­Communications and Transportation (SCT.)


For further information call INFOSAT at:


Mexico Toll-Free: 01 800 4636728 options 7-2-2-1-1.


US Toll-Free: 1 877 4488728 options 7-2-2-1-1.


Finally, anyone on board must have a Mexican fishing license whether fishing or not; directions on how to purchase fishing licenses online can be found here along with the Mexican Fishing Regulations: www.sportfishinginmexico.com.


Although Mexico may be checking for documents and permits more than in the past, they have made it much easier to comply with these requirements with their online systems in English.


For more information about the Temporary Import Permit regulations, they are translated into English here. www.californiasportfishing.org/temporary-importation-permit .


In addition, fishing licenses are required by all persons aboard a vessel fishing in Mexican waters regardless of age. The Mexican Navy oversees enforcing regulations by randomly boarding vessels. A copy of the inspection report will be provided to captains upon request.


Inspections also enforce immigration requirements. Visit our “FMM Instructions” section and follow instructions to process a Migratory Form for each individual onboard. For questions, please contact the corresponding government office.

www.californiasportfishing.org/fmm-visitor-form


To be forewarned is to be forearmed….


Links to the Show


Sat., Oct 6, 2018 Let’s Talk Hook-Up Saturday 10/6/18 — Live from the Sportfishing Association of California Open House – 7-8 a.m. youtu.be/Qww8amU80Pk


Sat., Oct 6, 2018 Let’s Talk Hookup Saturday 10/6/18- Live from the Sportfishing Association of California Open House – 8-9 a.m. youtu.be/tc7eoRUHcDw


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Jesus ‘Chuy’ Valdez - Baja Tourism and Sportfishing Visionary
whenaship

When a ship would go out of the harbor, people would stand, and they would watch that ship sail over the horizon.


Those left behind would say as the ship sails, “There she goes ... she’s gone.”


But somewhere there’s another harbor and when that ship appears on the horizon they say, “Here she comes.”


Jesus “Chuy” Valdez’s ship of life is not gone. He is but sailing toward a new horizon.


Sail on, dad, sail on. It’s a new day. – The Valdez Family


Jesus Valdez, founder of Hotel Buena Vista Beach Resort on the Sea of Cortez, died from an apparent heart attack on Sept. 22. The hotelier, fishing enthusiast and ardent conservationist was affectionately known as “Chuy” by generations of hotel guests, visiting anglers and employees.


Valdez, 75, died at the General Hospital in La Paz surrounded by his family after having played a round of golf earlier in the day. He is survived by his beloved wife and life’s partner, Imelda; sons, Esaul, Axel and Felipe, and his numerous grandchildren.


The hotel site was discovered in the mid-1950s by Mexican general and subsequent two-term Governor of the State of Baja, Augustin Olachea, where he built a Mexican hacienda. Some 20 years later in October 1976, Valdez, a young accountant, business and tourism entrepreneur from La Paz, leased the Olachea property and founded a modest fishing club called Spa Buenavista with 13 rooms primarily for anglers from California. He purchased the property in 1981; in 1982, the name was changed to the current Hotel Buena Vista Beach Resort.


It rapidly grew and with a fleet of sportfishing cruisers, pangas, dining facilities, a convention center, swimming pool, spa, manicured gardens and a cascade of rooms and cottages spilling down the hillside to the broad beach, it became part of East Cape’s rapidly-growing recreational tourism industry offering everything from fishing tournaments, to SCUBA diving, whale watching, weddings and family vacations.


Yvonne and I first met the Valdez family almost four decades ago when we attended one of the elaborate Cinco de Mayo celebrations held at their popular resort in the ’80s. The following year, we moved into “Rancho Deluxe” less than a mile down the beach, our home-away-from-home for nearly 18 years.


When we started “Baja on the Fly” in the early 1990s, Hotel Buena Vista Beach Resort was a convenient choice for some of our visiting clients. Saltwater fly-fishing, a new concept for the area, required some fine-tuning and as Baja on the Fly staff and guides worked closely with Chuy and his sons Esaul, Axel and Felipe, our friendship grew.


heissurvived
HE IS SURVIVED by his beloved wife and life’s partner, Imelda; sons, Esaul, Axel and Felipe, and his numerous grandchildren.

During our initial business meeting with Chuy, we realized how very different our cultures were, and how much we had to learn. But we realized that his word was his bond. I’m not certain he ever welcomed the concept of fly-fishing, but he did welcome us, and he made a place for Baja on the Fly in his world.


When Yvonne, Fanny Krieger, Pat Magnuson and the fledgling International Women Fly Fishers held their first annual Rendezvous in Baja, it was based out of the Hotel Buena Vista Beach Resort, attracting 80-plus women from around the world. Many of the women had never been to Baja, nor even out of the country, so they needed extra care.


The Valdez family, with Chuy leading them, rose to the occasion and the first-time event offering the unique Baja saltwater fly fishing to such a large group was a memorable affair because of their efforts – from dining under the stars to linen table cloths, mariachis, and other amenities that made their stay both comfortable and exciting – the Valdez family could not have made a better impression on the large group of women, many of whom have returned time and again over the years. Chuy seemed to know exactly what to do to make the guests feel welcome.


Over the years, Valdez and I grew closer as we united in our fight for conservation and preservation of the fisheries in Baja. He took an active leadership role in protecting the sportfishing industry for future generations. He was a Representative for International Game Fish Association (IGFA), and a spokesperson for conservation and preservation of the fishing industry until the day he died.


Tracy Ehrenberg, Pisces Group,sadly noted, “He was a true legend who fought the good fight without fear for conservation and fisheries here. He leaves a big hole in the sportfishing community at a time when he is truly needed.”


Coincidently, the last time I saw Chuy was at the Bisbee East Cape Offshore Tournament in early August. Chuy and Tricia Bisbee sprinkled Baja Legend Bob Bisbee’s ashes on the Sea of Cortez before the start on the first day.


He seemed to be in good health and good spirits, and he animatedly discussed the recent proposal of The Federal Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) to create a Natural Protected Area (ANP) along the coastline of the entire state of Baja Sur.


Yvonne and I were shocked and saddened by the devastating news of his passing. Another good man has left this earth; another warrior has left an empty place in line.


“Chuy taught us a lot over the years – about strength and dignity, and the basics of doing business in another land. We feel honored to have known Chuy, and our condolences go out to his family – to his sons who we consider friends. Rest in peace, Señor. Vaya con Dios.” - Gary and Yvonne Graham


Pisces Sportfishing’s 40th Anniversary… a true busman’s holiday
Earlier this month, I was invited to attend Pisces Sportfishing’s 40th Anniversary Celebration honoring their captains, mates, office staff, reservation agents, dock masters and others who had helped to create the largest sportfishing operation in Cabo San Lucas.

The celebration was to be an in-house sportfishing competition among the crews – a true busman’s holiday. Each crew member was encouraged to invite family, friends or even boat owners to spend the day observing what they do for clients, all day, every day. At the end of the day there was to be a huge fiesta celebrating the winners and honoring the Pisces Sportfishing family.


This allowed the teams to share the passion that had led them to their careers in sportfishing, which, by the way, was contagious, and every one of them enjoyed the fun of competing for the honor of being named The Best in the Pisces Fleet!


The Captain’s Meeting was held on the second floor of the Pisces Building in the recently opened Galati Yacht Sales Office. Captains and crews of 23 of the 25 sportfishers in the Pisces Fleet attended the informal affair. Friendly bantering echoed throughout the office before Rebecca and Tracy Ehrenberg began the meeting by outlining the schedule and simple rules for the first-ever Crew Tournament ( probably the first of its kind, worldwide). Only dorado, yellowfin tuna and wahoo, along with billfish (release only), would count.


A full day of competitive fishing on Sunday, complete with a “flare-gun start” and a weigh-in would conclude with a huge dock party at Cabo’s Marina Del Rey Dock, where the first Pisces trips had begun.


Long before dawn, light rain greeted the teams as they slowly motored out to the start line. Many stopped to load up on live bait and by the start time, the light rain had become a torrent, adding another degree of difficulty for the competing teams.


The 85-foot Contessa, with more than 20 office staff, former employees and other guests marked the starting line. Marco and Tracy huddled together on the bow in the pouring rain to fire the flare, signaling the start as fleet boats, ranging from 28- to 72-feet, roared past in search of the winning fish. A handful of the fleet decided to make the long run up to the Finger Bank, where there had been rumors of WFO billfish action while most of the fleet stayed closer to the tip or ventured up into the Sea of Cortez.


Meanwhile, banners were strung, the digital scale was tested and other last-minute details were completed before the weigh-station opened at 3 p.m. Then, the festivities began: music played, fresh fish was served and the crowd grew and grew to more than 200 people. With hugs, laughter and tears, people greeted one another and many reminisced about how Pisces and the Ehrenberg family had influenced their lives. Regardless of the size of the crowd, it felt like an intimate family affair.


The parade of boats then began arriving with their catches. Caliente was the first boat with their dorado — the largest of which weighed 14.35 pounds.


The parade continued, and more and more friends and families gathered to observe the weigh-ins, which included several notable dorado catches; unfortunately, wahoo and tuna were missing from the count.


However, in the billfish category:


Those boats that headed 50 miles up to the Finger Bank had to deal with a cranky ocean full of whitecaps.


Just before closing time, Hot Rod, the first of three boats that had made the long journey north, slid up to the dock with 16 billfish flags fluttering in the breeze, signifying that many releases.


Tracy Ann followed soon after the weigh-station closed with 17 flags flying. Tracy Annwould have been the winner, but was DQed due to their late arrival at the scale.


The Yahoo with 6 releases also arrived late and was DQed.


While at the dock, Captain Ricardo of Yahoo introduced his two guests, Alberto Nava from Savannah, Georgia, and Edgar Pedroza, of Colima, Mexico, visiting Cabo San Lucas for the first time and caught their first-ever billfish. “It was great to have my ‘primo’ and my friend of many years come all the way to fish with me here in this tournament,” Ricardo marveled excitedly.


Fish stories, memories and anecdotes ricocheted throughout the crowd before the trophies and cash prizes were passed out by the Ehrenberg’s and friends.


“Of course, they are all the best! They are all winners in our eyes!” Tracy Ehrenberg noted as she and Marco passed out the awards and prizes.


Winners included:


1st Place Billfish Release, Captain Eriberto Orozco Hot Rod; 42’ Cabo 16 striped marlin released.


2nd Place Billfish, Captain Enrique Winkler, Tag Team III; 37’ Viking Billfish 1 striped marlin, 2 sailfish released.


3rd Place Billfish, Captain Oscar Ivan Gomez Zenteno, Listo; 48’ Viking 1 blue marlin released.


1st Place Dorado, Captain Rosendo Gomez, 30’ Bertram Moppie Rapala for Team Tiburon 45.10-pounds.


2nd Place Dorado, Captain Alberto Lira, 31’ Bertram Ruthless 25.45-pounds.


3rd Place Dorado, Captain Jamie Gonzalez, 40’ Cabo Caliente 14.35-pounds.


Hard Luck Award #1 31’ Bertram Tracy Ann which released 17 striped marlin which would have been the winner, but was late returning.


Hard Luck Award #2 to 42’ Bertram Yahoo, which made it back about 10 minutes after Hot Rod with 6 striped marlin released.


firstplacedorado
FIRST-PLACE DORADO, Captain Rosendo Gomez, 30-foot Bertram Moppie Rapala for Team Tiburon 45.10-pounds.


regardlessoftheREGARDLESS OF THE size of the crowd, it felt like an intimate family affair.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Old school…
As I was unpacking the Roadtrekker earlier this year, I uncovered a plastic box filled with Scampi tails in various colors. I don’t know how long they had been in there; I’m pretty sure it wasn’t my original box, but one similar had always been a fundamental part of my fishing gear.

Years ago, Joe and Lori Graves of San Diego developed a lure they named “Scampi,” consisting of a weighted head and hook combination that allowed a plastic tail to be slipped over. Scampi lures came in five sizes from a small 3-inch version to a monster 10-inch model and it had tremendous action when sinking.


iintroducedthem
I INTRODUCED THEM to my buddy, Tom Miller, who also became an avid fan.


I found they worked fantastic for both bay and inshore saltwater fishing and were made from much tougher plastic than most of today’s soft plastic baits. Their most popular colors were chartreuse sparkle and root beer sparkle, with hot pink sparkle and squid also being popular.


Their slogan, “Everything eats them,” was compelling enough for our team on the WaterCloset to give them a try. Then, when I began exploring Baja beaches in 1973, they were a fundamental item that I packed in my van, and they still are.


I introduced them to my buddy, Tom Miller, who also became an avid fan. Their small size, coupled with their effectiveness, made them ideal for traveling, and he and I never made a trip without them.


Regardless of where I traveled, they became a part of my travel kit, along with a small collapsible spinning rod. Yvonne laughed on our wedding trip to Cancun in 1979 as we were unpacking and she spotted my “emergency” fishing gear. My challenge was to catch something on each trip.


When I first visited Magdalena Bay, my friend Enrique Soto’s eyes sparkled when he spotted the 4-inch long Scampi complete with a solid white tail. “Muy bueno for linguado (halibut),” he observed, as he held it up to the light.


Over the years as I have fished beaches and esteros throughout Baja, local anglers share Soto’s enthusiasm for the lure’s effectiveness for a variety of species.


One of the original soft plastic baits in the saltwater industry, this is a saltwater fishing lure that should stay in your tackle box. They’ve been tried and tested for years and and are proven to work on many species. They can even be found on Amazon.


But there is another designer that has captured my respect. I first met Patrick Sebile at Crocodile Bay Resort in Costa Rica on a Penn Fam trip a few years back.


And I’ve been impressed with his lures and the thought and innovation that goes into them since. According to his bio, Sebile’s passion, experience and in-depth knowledge of the widest possible range of species and fishing styles is what influences his lure designs.


Since then I’ve bumped into him at various shows, including the Fred Hall Long Beach show here on the West Coast, where he was usually perched on a fish tank demonstrating his different lure designs.


More recently, on my annual pilgrimage to the ICast show this past July in Orlando, Fla., I walked 12 miles in two days (according to the app on my cellphone) and the number of booths offering different salt and freshwater lures was astonishing. Honestly, they were overwhelming. In the saltwater department there was a dizzying array of topwater, swimmers and plastics to entice a seemingly endless variety of different species. And there, I ran into Sebile once again.


Complex body shapes never seen before are the trademark of his lures: the Magic Swimmer, Koolie Minnow, Onduspoon, Flat Shad and Stick Shad are some of his creations.


Sebile melds his love of fishing with a background in mechanical design principles such as turbulence and hydrodynamics to make his lures more effectively replicate a real-life baitfish. Generous to a fault, he always provided me with some of his latest creations. One of which has qualified to be part of my “must-have” lures when fishing in Baja.


His “Magic Swimmer” is one of my favorite, and is also included in my tackle box in the Roadtrekker. Designed awhile back, it has an impressive swimming action that when seen in the water one is sure it’s alive.


Sebile recently started a new company called “A Band of Anglers.” Hopefully he will be able to duplicate the success of my favorite, “Magic Swimmer,” with many others.


Of course, I have acquired many other “latest creation” samples from other companies and will be field testing them in the upcoming fall season. It remains to be seen if any of them will make it in my “Must-Have Tackle Box.”


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


2018 Gran Final a CLIFFHANGER
After dropping my gear at La Mision, we headed for an unexpected, second event which was a surprise addition to my two-day itinerary — the 26th Annual Tourneo Pesca, Reglamento de Poyas by Club de Caza Tiro Y Pesca based at the Hotel Desert Inn at the waterfront at the north end of Loreto, B.C.S.

This unique affair attracts many families in search of a weekend holiday who call home the area in and around Santo Domingo Valle in the municipality of Comondú del Estado de B.C.S.


Standing in line, many teams in their matching, custom t-shirts were cautiously optimistic as they paid their entry, receiving tournament t-shirts along with authentic “farmers’ straw hats” that seemed appropriate.


Many participants had traveled from the U.S. to enter the event, and regardless of their Spanish or English language skills, local and visiting anglers alike seemed to be able to communicate on common ground — “fish-speak.”


Saturday morning when the roosters began to crow, followed by the distant chiming of bells (perhaps from the tower of the Loreto Mission), 52 teams were at the starting line aboard assorted pangas and other trailered boats waiting for the audible pop of the multiple flare guns to be fired, not in distress but signaling the beginning of the day’s fishing.


A gaggle of local and visiting dignitaries were eagerly watching as the boats roared off into the Sea of Cortez hoping to find a dorado large enough to put the anglers in the winner’s circle, earning them the right to do it all over again in Sunday’s event as well.


While the teams searched for the large dorado in hopes of gaining entry in the next event, another set of teams who had already earned their invitation to compete in the “Grand Final” of the serial "Dos Mares 2018," waited to register for the Sunday fish-off.


When registration opened at noon, there was a line of teams eager to plunk their entry fee money down as well as the monies for various jackpots offered. Throughout the afternoon, the crowd of spectators and registered teams mingled as they were entertained by local musicians, dance troupes and comedians in what seemed more like a fiesta than a registration. Later that evening, it merged into a Captains Meeting conducted by Gonzalo Alamea, Tournament Director, Dos Mares 2018.


The rules were lengthy, and changes included a redrawn grid, a requirement to report the location of any hook-ups, and a rule eliminating any boats with three outboards and/or inboards from entering the tournament. There was little discussion about the rule changes and the meeting went smoothly.


Long before sunup on Sunday, the 115 teams that entered began gathering off the entrance jetty to the marina. At precisely 6:30-a.m. by the rockets’ red glare, the fleet went their way.


Many appeared to head into the sunrise. Rumor had it that the larger dorado caught on Saturday in the 26th Annual Tourneo Pesca and by boats pre-fishing the “Gran Final” had located most of the larger dorado farther offshore. With calm seas and fast boats, the offshore areas were well within range.


By mid-morning, fish hooked, and their locations were reported via VHF. It was clear that this year’s event would NOT be a repeat of 2017’s “slim pickings” for the larger fish.


Twenty-six dorado weighing in the double-digit range were brought to the weigh-station before the official closing time of 4:00-p.m.


“Team Party Boy” led by Jesus Salvador Agundez arrived at the scale a mere 47 minutes after the scale had opened with their 38.8-pound dorado to grab first place … temporarily. But their party was short-lived! “Team Marmakos” and angler Ariel Negrete Alanis with his team’s 42.5-pounds brought their winner to the scale at 12.52-p.m., placing them at the top of the leaderboard.


For the next several hours, Team Marmakos” hovered around the entrance to the scales. Then after carefully eying the catch, they collectively held their breaths as each new challenger’s official weight was announced by the weighmaster before they broke out in boisterous cheers.


When “Team Renovados,” along with angler Gerardo Ivan Prado and the remainder of their team uncovered their huge dorado at near-closing time of the weigh station, “Team Marmakos” gazed at it uneasily as it was hoisted up on the scale.


The weighmaster stared intently at the slowly spinning fish and then at the digital scale, waiting for the fish to stop and the digital numbers settle. Then he bellowed: FORTY-ONE POUNDS (pause) NINE OUNCES! The spectators gasped as “Team Marmakos” erupted in cheers.


For the next 25 additional agonizing minutes, they would hold their breaths, as they watched a few more, much smaller dorado found their way to the scales. Then they erupted in cheers as they preened for the photographers!


The return flight on Tuesday was filled with tournament participants who seemed to agree that the weekend in Loreto could not have been better. Fishing had not been this good for several years; the weather was near-perfect, and the two tournaments back-to-back gave them more chances to catch that one fish. But to top it all, where in the world could you find a more beautiful get-away, with more charming people than Loreto?


Winnerslefttoright
WINNERS LEFT TO RIGHT, 1st, “Team Marmakos” 2nd “Team Renovados,” and 3rd “Team Party Boy”


standinginline
STANDING IN LINE, many teams in their matching, custom t-shirts were cautiously optimistic as they paid their entry, receiving tournament t-shirts along with authentic “farmers’ straw hats” that seemed appropriate.


fiftytwoteams
52 TEAMS WERE at the starting line aboard assorted pangas and other trailered boats waiting for the audible pop of the multiple flare guns to be fired, not in distress but signaling the beginning of the day’s fishing.


TEAM Captain Dorado Weight Jackpots Tournament Awards in Pesos


1st Marmakos Ariel Negrete Alanis 42.5-pounds $118,000.00 $279,000.00


2nd Renovados Gerardo Ivan Prado 41.9-pounds $183,500.00 $167,400.00


3rd Party Boy Jesus Salvador Agundez 38.8-pounds $111,600.00



Sponsor prize Value (in pesos) Awarded to


Egencia Arjona / 140 HP, 4 stroke Suzuki, Suzuki outboard motor $280,000 1st place (Marmakos) 


PMA / Yamaha 01 motor marino FB $260,000 2nt place (Renovados) Yamaha de 75 HP, 4 tiempos


Embarcaciones 01 embarcación de pesca $75,000 Captain of the 1st place team



Álvarez deportiva de 24 pies. (Ariel Negrete Alanis)


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


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