CALIFORNIA'S ONLY SPORTSMAN'S NEWS SINCE 1953

Gary Graham – ROAD TREKKER



ROAD TREKKER /
WON News Column by Gary Graham

Gary Graham's published credits would fill many pages, two books on saltwater fly fishing, and hundreds of feature articles.

His  current leadership activities in the sportfishing community include: Avalon Tuna Club, member since the 1980s, San Diego Marlin Club, International Game Fish Association (IGFA), Baja California representative; Federation of Fly Fishers (FFF), certified fly casting instructor; Outdoor Writers of California, president; Outdoor Writers of America.

Gary Graham can be reached at: roadtrekker1@gmail.com

It’s all about the kids
Robert Burns in his poem To a Mouse said, “The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry. No matter how carefully a project is planned, something may still go wrong …”

And no matter how hard we tried, our recent trip did just that!


Don Dingman, whose passion is fishing and the future of the kids, and I met at the Gray FishTag symposium in Ft. Lauderdale last December and realized we had a common goal — helping kids.


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HIS SON ALAN loves to fish and to underscore that fact, Jansen sent me a photo of him holding a huge snook caught from the beach.


In mid-March, the following message popped up from Dingman: “I keep running past your card… ‘It’s all about the kids’ and since this is pretty much everything we do, is there any way I can help with Stars and Stripes Tournament?


“Unfortunately, I can’t make the dates this year. It falls after an event we do in Jacksonville, Florida where ‘It’s all about the kids’ as well. We could shoot a Hook the Future episode with you and a couple of kids to promote the tournament and the cause sometime in the future.


“If you can get a boat and a couple of English-speaking Mexican kids, we can get the crew to Cabo. The show currently airs on the Sportsman Channel, World Fishing Net­work and Fox Sports South, and is available to over 110 million households!”


The Stars and Stripes Tour­nament is scheduled for late June; Dingman only had a possible short window in mid-April. Disappointed, we agreed to try to do something in 2020.


After hanging up the telephone, I began making calls and texting folks who I thought might be able to help us put together a fishing trip for two Mexican junior anglers on such short notice.


My friend Jorge Tellez, owner of Gaviota Sportfishing Fleet with his brother and partner Sergio, responded; it was a resounding “Yesssss!” And we went to work. His employer, Solmar Properties, volunteered rooms for the film crew and staff, and he and Sergio donated Solmar 1, a 33-foot Crystaliner for two days.


Reservations were put in place for the flight, room, and boat on April 9-13 for Dingman and his crew.


Now for the stars, our local junior anglers.


I contacted my friend Stephen Jansen, owner of Jansen Inshore Tackle in Cabo San Lucas, who is involved with a local Rotary Club’s children’s beach tournament in Cabo. Jansen located Oswaldo Ortega, who worked on one of the larger sportfishers. His son Alan loved to fish and to underscore that fact, Jansen sent me a photo of him holding a huge snook caught from the beach.


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BOTH BOYS CERTAINLY proved, that like their fathers, they were not strangers to fishing as they reeled in Lucky Joes, five mackerel at time and helped each other removing them into the live well.


I contacted Oswaldo (nicknamed Baleen), who worked with Captain Greg Distefano aboard El Suertudo. I had met Baleen at a party where Distefano was named International Captain of the Year by the publication In the Bite where Baleen was honored as well. He gave permission for Alan to be part of the trip.


Then, Captain Mark Rayor, Team Jen Wren out of East Cape, responded that one of his captain’s sons, Ervis Romero, could fish the two days. After receiving permission from his father Diego Romero, the boys Alan and Ervis were our stars.


Day One: The grumpy Pacific had been stirred up by three days of strong southwest wind and the uphill ride was not what we had hoped for, but our young stars were seasoned troopers and didn’t complain.


When we arrived at our destination, the word was out. “Golden Gate” was clearly the place to be. A large fleet of sportfishers milled about among the bait balls.


Frigate birds circled above the nearly football field-wide bait balls as they were chased to the surface by voracious predators. The boys proved they were not strangers to fishing, reeling in Lucky Joes — five mackerel at time — and helped each other dump them into the live well with some of the fattest mackerel we had seen in awhile.


The fleet slowly diminished, boats heading one-by-one in different directions. Soon, all that was left were a few smaller Cabo charters along with an 80-foot Weaver, the “El Suertudo,” the boat that Alan’s father worked on. Not far from us, they connected with a striped marlin and we watched as they quickly fought and released it.


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FOR THE BOYS and for that matter the “Hooked for Life” crew that was the highlight of the trip providing the best “photo-ops” of the trip.


Although we saw a few stripers, we had only one bite on a tailer as we pointed the boat down-swell toward home. Laughingly, Dingman asked Captain Javier if there were any bananas on board?


But, tomorrow is another day and as they say; “It’s not over until the Fat Lady sings!” We did not hear her warming up in the background.


The final day brought a much calmer sea and promises of much closer yellowfin tuna and striped marlin greeted us. We doubled our order of mackerel and cabillito in anticipation of yellowfin and marlin charging the boat!


However, the sea temps had dropped several degrees and was off-color from currents sweeping down the Baja coast. As hard as Captain Javier and his mate Irving tried, all we could come up with was one quick marlin follow.


We had struck out for the second day in a row. We heard the Fat Lady!


As Dingman left the boat, he thanked the captain for all his efforts and asked, “Are you certain there are no bananas hidden below deck?”


Our “stars” were old hands at this, and if they were disappointed, they didn’t show it.


To liven things up, the real of the trip introduced himself. “Pancho” or a Pancho imposter, is a sea lion that has been a local legend in the IGY Marina for many years. It is the official greeter for sportfishers, meeting them at the Harbor Channel entrance as they dump unused bait while idling to their respective slips.


Pancho has become more aggressive and now climbs on the boats’ swim platforms and begs for the squirming discarded baitfish.


He or she has learned to sit up over the covering board — a crowd pleaser that quickly became a must-see photo-op for anglers and tourists alike.


For the boys, and for that matter the “Hooked for Life” crew, that was the highlight of the trip and best photo-ops of the two days… a reminder that even the best laid plans are not written in stone.


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


A Preface for Budding Mex 1 Road Explorers
Baja roads have been a significant part of my life since 1973 when a couple of buddies and I decided to get an up-close look at the recently- completed Mex 1 that had opened that year.

Mex 1 was a two-lane asphalt highway stretching 1,063 miles from the border between the U.S. and Tijuana to Cabo San Lucas.


It was hard to believe that we could drive from border to tip on a paved road instead of the often unmarked, rocky, dirt track that wound through the desert and mountains. Ray Cannon’s, “The Sea of Cortez” and his weekly WON‘Baja Beat’ columns fanned our imagination, and we set out to see for ourselves.


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ONE THAT IS relatively new and handy to bookmark in your browser ishttps://tinyurl.com/BajaRoads. It offers locations of reports of storm damage, road construction and detours for the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico.


Little did I know that Mex 1 would become forever woven into the fabric of my life.


We crossed the border in a bare, mid-60s Dodge van with two bucket seats, a curtain that hid a mattress on the floor in the rear, along with duffel bags, an ice chest, folding chaise lounges and sleeping bags — and we were off on the beginning of our adventure.


Looking back at faded black and white photos of that initial road trip, I realize that they confirmed Cannon’s stories, which were not only true but very likely understated.


I have since made countless trips up and down the highway, exploring, camping, guiding and of course, fishing, at every opportunity.


In the early days, few travelers trickled down, and everything was a question. Road conditions, availability of gasoline, places to eat, (restaurants were few), where to camp and so forth. It was common practice to stop along the road and exchange information with other travelers going in both directions. New friends were made.


The adventures have been priceless. I shared coffee and a Baja sunrise with Ray Cannon on the porch at Rancho Buena Vista Hotel and caught my first white seabass in the surf with Tom Miller (author of the “Baja Book” and WON columnist of the ‘Baja Beat’). I chased sierra with Chuck Walters, while his father, the “Colonel,” looked on … (the Colonel was one of the pioneers who made Rancho Buena Vista Hotel famous in the 1960s). I swapped Baja stories (and secret fishing spots) with Fred Hoctor, another WON columnist of Baja Beat, while watching the sunset at Punta Bunda. I fished with Gene Kira and his son, Gifford, at Magdalena Bay and was with Gene when he caught his first Baja snook.


Yvonne and I made frequent trips driving Mex 1 while we had “Rancho Deluxe” at East Cape. Eager to arrive at our Baja beachfront home, and driving “pedal to the metal,” we allowed little time for exploring and wore out several vans in the process.


Judging by some of the questions I hear at shows and see in social media, many newcomers planning their first Baja road trip down the Baja Peninsula consider it as daunting today as we did 46 years ago.


However, it’s astonishing the amount of information that is now available for those Baja Mex 1 and Mex 5 explorers. First, there are two very active travel clubs: Vagabundo del Mar and Discover Baja. Both provide tons of information and services to help newcomers as well as seasoned veterans, either in person, on the telephone or online.


Add the convenience of good cell service most everywhere (except between El Rosario and Guerrero Negro) and better Wi-Fi and internet, which all allow travelers to be able to check online for current road updates on Travel Club sites, as well as some Facebook groups.


In addition to localized groups for different areas throughout Baja, some cover the entire peninsula. Several to look for: “On the Road in Mexico,” “Talk Baja,” plus “Talk Baja Road Conditions,” along with the “Baja Weather Channel.” These are all favorites of mine that I check frequently.


One that is relatively new and handy to bookmark in your browser is https://tinyurl.com/BajaRoads. It offers locations of reports of storm damage, road construction and detours for the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico.


Also, for anglers, many of the sportfishing fleets and individual charter companies that WON mentions have FB pages where up-to-date information about conditions and catches is available. And, if you search “Baja Fishing Groups,” you will find many that share your interest in Baja and sportfishing.


If you have been on the fence about driving to Baja, take it from someone who has made hundreds of trips over the past five decades. It has never been easier, nor has there ever been as much information so readily available for you to research and plan for a smooth, pleasant and memorable trip to Baja.


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Baja Multihull, a novel option
My first fishing experience on the Sea of Cortez was in 1956. I visited the very primitive town of Guaymas, Mexico with my uncle and a group of his friends. We drove the 1,000 miles towing his 16-foot Wizard fiberglass trailer boat behind us. I was 16 years old.

My fishing experiences in the Sea of Cortez continued with three or four boats I owned, including my 23-foot Blackman Center Console. It was a trailer boat I left in Baja Sur off-and-on from 1977 until the mid ’80s. I was also fortunate enough to be a guest on many sportfishers over the years, ranging in size from 48 to 100 feet – the Ocean Pacific, the Legend, the High Life, the Pastime, theC-Bandit, the Zopilote, the War Eagle, the Sea Mark, the Rojean and the Kingsway to name a few that come to mind.


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WHEN HE OFFERED to give me a tour on one of his 50-foot x 26-foot Saba Multihulls, I eagerly accepted.


There were a few attempts at sailing in an 8-foot Sabot and, in 1988, Maureen O’Connor, Mayor of San Diego at the time, designated our 42-foot Uniflyte, the Water Closet, her official America's Cup yacht for the summer. It was a cool gig and Yvonne and I entertained different VIPs as guests and spectators on the Mayor’s official vessel. Among the notable guests were Brian A. Marshall, Great Britain’s Sherriff of Nottingham and his family.


Coincidently, Dennis Connor, along with his team on his catamaran Stars & Stripes, were the victors.


By this time in my life, I knew a lot about boats powered with either gas or diesel, but not so much about boats powered with wind … sailboats.


Last November, upon accepting an invitation to Marina Puerto Escondido for their Grand Opening, I was introduced to Kurt Jerman, owner of West Coast Multihulls, based out of San Diego that he had founded in 1999. In his early years in the marine industry, Jerman lived aboard and cruised extensively, and he has sailed practically every multihull on the market. He is also a highly-experienced power boater who has parlayed many years as business manager for one international builder of trimarans into a regional dealership for cruising catamarans and trimarans.


West Coast Multihulls’ location on the waterfront at Marina Puerto Escondido outside of Loreto is home to a small fleet of luxury cruising catamarans, along with a full-service marina, boatyard, store and restaurant. When he offered to give me a tour on one of his 50-foot x 26-foot Saba Multihulls, I eagerly accepted.


I was amazed at the accommodations, which included six staterooms along with six heads for 12 passengers – offering the ideal platform to explore 10 islands and dozens of unique anchorages throughout the area.


Many years ago in the mid ’70s I towed an 18-foot Bayliner to Nopolo Cove, about half the distance north towards Loreto. Deserted, the only development at that time was a cobblestone street along the beach where we camped. We would launch at a primitive launch ramp which was called Bahia Escondido. We fished, snorkeled and explored the surrounding islands during our many visits.


It is no longer called Bahia Escondido. After being dredged, it became Marina Puerto Escondido with 125 slips and other facilities.


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AS WE SKITTERED over the light chop, I found a couple of trolling rods in the overhead racks and soon had lures swimming in the clean wake behind the boat.


As it turned out, I had a chance meeting at the official opening of the Marina with our friend Captain Pat Rains, author and photographer, who has logged more than 100,000 nautical miles skippering a variety of yachts (sail and power) up and down the coasts of Mexico and Central America while updating her nautical guidebooks – Mexico Boating Guide,” “Cruising Ports: the Central American Route,” andMexWX: Mexico Weather for Boaters .”


The two of us were invited to take an afternoon cruise aboard the multi-hulled Saba with other guests visiting Jerman. We both admired the spacious craft as we cleared the harbor. There was seating everywhere – topside, up forward, on the bridge and in the cockpit. Soon, the sails were unfurled, and the unobtrusive, quiet motor was silenced as the light winds filled the sail.


As we skittered over the light chop, I found a couple of trolling rods in the overhead racks and soon had lures swimming in the clean wake behind the boat.


Seabirds could be heard squawking as they followed us from one island to another. The porpoise found us as well, and without the engine noise, we heard the sounds of their splashes as they leapfrogged toward us while we trolled a little shy of 10 knots under sail.


While the other guests enjoyed their drinks and snacks chatting about the Baja scenery, I found myself mesmerized as I watched the lures, trying to will a dorado into the pattern for a photo-op. Then I began imagining how great it would be to spend a week exploring the surrounding islands on the catamaran with a group of friends, anchoring in different coves, fishing close to shore in the inflatable – just doing all the stuff that often is taken for granted on the Sea of Cortez.


Never had I considered a sailboat as an option. According to Jerman, the cost is remarkably affordable at approximately $6,000 for a three-day trip or $12,000 (not including food/drinks or taxes) for a week with a licensed captain.


This is not your run of the mill “sailboat!” It would be fair to say that the prototype was Dennis Connor’s Stars & Stripes that we watched win that America’s Cup back in 1988.


You did more than win that race, Dennis. You and your crew gave us a platform that will serve us well into the future.


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


It’s showtime! Forget Facebook — it’s facetime!
By all accounts, the 73rd Annual Fred Hall World’s Largest Sportfishing Show has no spaces left — the staff is abuzz with the notion that this could be the largest one ever!

The beauty of the show for those who love Baja, both long-time veteran visitors as well as newcomers, is that there is a large contingency of representatives of Baja all under one roof at the Long Beach Convention Center offering an extensive array of locations and types of sportfishing from the border to the tip of Baja.


The Fred Hall Show provides a fantastic opportunity to meet the folks who live, work, and play in Baja. Plan to spend at least one full day, but more if necessary, allowing yourself all the time you need to plan your 2019 Baja season.


Introduce yourself to the many new operations; be one of the first to discover them. Reintroduce yourself to some of your old favorites who may have new upgrades, new boats, new personnel. And there are always some “specials,” discounts that will save you some money at the show.


The Baja California Sur Tourism group will be well represented this year with Government officials and representatives of hotels and marinas; they are available to share many sportfishing opportunities that their state has to offer from the northern border at Guerrero Negro to Baja’s tip, Cabo San Lucas.


Introduce yourself to:


Andres Cordova, Baja Sur Secretary of Fisheries (Secretario de Pesca, Acuacultura y Desarrollo Agropecuario).


Clicerio Mercado: The local Bisbee's Tournaments Representative.


Gonzalo Alamea (The Copa Campeones Calisureños Baja Tournament Director) – a series of 26 grassroots sportfishing tournaments held throughout Baja Sur: Cabo San Lucas, San Jose del Cabo, La Paz, Loreto, El Cardonal, Buena Vista, Punta Chivato, Bahia Ascension, Punta Abreojos, and Todos Santos. All have been covered extensively in the WON “RoadTrekker” column since their inception.


Cesar Angulo (Webmaster: https://www.sportfishingbcs.gob.mx/ ) – the official website for purchasing Mexican Fishing Licenses. He will be available throughout the show to answer your questions regarding Mexican Licenses.


Lourdes Antillón (Baja California Sur Tourism Board tour and travel manager).


Rene Olinger (Baja Peninsula Adventures, Loreto).


Felipe Valdez Martinez (Fleet Owner, Buena Vista).


Agustin Olachea (Head of the Board of the Hotel and Tour Operators of La Paz)

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Other areas of Baja Represented:

— Mexico Marina Association /AMM

— Baja Fishing Convoys

— Cass Tours, LLC

— Vagabundos Del Mar Club

— Lynn Rose Tours

— Clarks Outdoor Sporting Adventures


Ensenada

— Marla Sportfishing


Cedros Island

— Cedros Kayak Fishing

— Cedros Outdoor Adventures

— Cedros Sportfishing


Sea of Cortez Midriff Islands

— The Longfin (Tony Reyes) Multi-day Trips


Loreto

— Rene Olinger (Baja Peninsula Adventures, Loreto)


La Paz

— Baja Pirates Fishing Fleet

— Tailhunter Sportfishing

— Palapas Ventana


East Cape (Los Barriles)

— Baja's Van Wormer Resorts

— Hotel Buenavista Beach Resort

— Martin Verdugo’s Beach Resort

— Rancho Leonero Resort


Cabo San Lucas

— Blue Sky Cabo


Mexico Mainland

— Marla Sportfishing, Puerto Vallarta


After taking time to figure out where, when and what species you are going to target in Baja, check out all the great seminars being offered throughout the day, every day, during the show to fine-tune your techniques.


There are always special deals for all kinds of tackle and clothing — “must haves” for the upcoming 2019 season. You won’t find any deals better than at the show.


By the way, if you look for me you can often find me checking out the “Dock Dogs” Jumping Competitions. It’s always a neat place eat lunch and watch them fly!


Now on to another subject. Captain Ken Franke, President of the Sportfishing Association of California called to give me the scoop on the bracelets that are required to be worn by each person aboard a vessel in the protected area of Mexico Biospheres (example: Coronado Islands).


The protected areas are managed by the Mexican Agency, " CONANP."


CONANP has created a "passport" that will permit a person to enter protected Biospheres areas anywhere in Mexico for an entire year from the date of purchase for a cost of less than $20, instead of the $5 per trip that was once required. The "passport" must be in your possession while in the protected area. This seems to be a pretty good deal.


CONANP Protected Area Bracelets ("passport") can be purchased at: https://pasaportedelaconservacion.conanp.gob.mx/vistas/inicio.php


Don’t forget to stop by the WON booth and say hello to the gang. And don’t forget to renew your subscription and take a spin on the wheel for some cool stuff.


The show is a celebration of fishing, but it is so much more. It’s my chance to see so many faces that I don’t get to see that often, if at all, throughout the year; so, I’m getting fired up to go visit “Baja” and many of my friends. See you at Fred Hall, Long Beach!


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BY THE WAY, if you look for me you can often find me checking out the “Dock Dogs” Jumping Competitions.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.



Weather, Great White and Whales
The year 2019 is barely a month old and my “Roadtrekker” note file is already brimming with unusual snippets of Baja news from the Border to the Tip.

It appears the current “World News” knows no borders. No, I’m not about to launch into a discussion about walls, fences, etc. — let’s stick with the weather.


Over the past several weeks, the weather gurus, have talked about a phenomenon in the meteorological world, the “Polar Vortex,” (frigid air that blows in from the poles of the earth — in this case the north pole). It has delivered sub-zero freezing temperatures in the Eastern United States, along with freezing temperatures and snow on the northern states along the West Coast, with torrential rains and near-freezing temperatures on the southernmost areas of California, creating a double-whammy that has affected both coasts of the United States.


Clearly the weather recognizes no walls, fences, or borders; this is confirmed by anglers in northern Baja who are beginning their reports with mentions of the cold weather all the way down to Magdalena Bay, where the towns are full of bundled-up “whale watchers.”


Baja Road Update:


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THE NATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL  Observatory of the UNAM in San Pedro Martir was closed due to the ice that formed following the rain.”... David Kier


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SHORTLY AFTER THAT post, the “Polar Vortex” effect set in.


Although Mex One road reports have been favorable, a Vagabundos Del Mar Mexico Boat and Travel Club member, Randy Brown, posted: “MX 1 is in the best shape that it has been for the past three or four years. There are still some potholes and road construction, so you need to drive with caution, but most of the potholes and sinkholes have been repaired and the driving lines are now painted on the new section of road near the Catavina area. However, it is very important not to drive at night because it’s impossible to see the potholes in the dark,” he concluded.


Shortly after that post, the “Polar Vortex” effect set in. La Rumorosa is a mountain pass at an elevation of 4,042 feet above sea level that links Tecate and Mexicali; it was closed recently due to ice...


“The National Astronomical Observatory of the UNAM in San Pedro Martir was closed due to the ice that formed following the rain.”... David Kier



A Great White named Deep Blue


Since that initial discovery, she has gained quite a following; the 50-year-old beast is estimated to be 20-feet long and is now considered the largest recorded shark in the world.


A fascinating story that surfaced recently was of a huge great white shark that reportedly had been seen, tagged and filmed at Guadalupe Island off the coast of Baja in 2015.


Since that spotting, apparently the monster shark Deep Blue decided to head west across the Eastern Pacific where she was spotted in a rare sighting off the coast of Oahu, 2,500 hundred miles from Guadalupe Island, swimming right up to some divers who filmed the encounter.


Deep Blue can be seen gliding through the water with her massive fins, flashing her razor-sharp teeth for the camera.


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SINCE THAT INITIAL discovery, she has gained quite a following; the 50-year-old beast is estimated to be 20-feet long and is now considered the largest recorded shark in the world.


She is so famous that she has her own “Twitter Page” @Deep_Blue_Shark with nearly 20.000 followers.


Ocean Ramsey, a marine biologist and swimsuit model, observed, “The huge shark was one of the most gentle of sharks I have ever encountered over the past decade in my research.”


Here is the link to the video. https://youtu.be/vuE_ubJiCQs


Grays, Humpbacks and Blue Whales


And finally, this season’s whale watching has already been a crowd pleaser as the gray whales settle into the lagoons and bay, dotting the Pacific side of Baja and the humpbacks frolic at Baja’s tip, while the blue whales begin filtering in at Loreto.


Hopefully, the weather will soon warm back up and the adventure-minded visitors will once again begin pouring into Baja eager to enjoy all that Baja has to offer during 2019.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


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