Accurate Fishing Products


CALIFORNIA'S ONLY SPORTSMAN'S NEWS SINCE 1953

Gary Graham – ROAD TREKKER



ROAD TREKKER /
WON News Column by Gary Graham

Gary Graham's published credits would fill many pages, two books on saltwater fly fishing, and hundreds of feature articles.

His  current leadership activities in the sportfishing community include: Avalon Tuna Club, member since the 1980s, San Diego Marlin Club, International Game Fish Association (IGFA), Baja California representative; Federation of Fly Fishers (FFF), certified fly casting instructor; Outdoor Writers of California, president; Outdoor Writers of America.

Gary Graham can be reached at: roadtrekker1@gmail.com

Travel Tidbits
The past six weeks have been a whirlwind of activity, which as usual has managed to be filled with a few unplanned adventures. But for adventures to happen, one must remain flexible, meeting many challenges, as I’ve learned over the years.

Back-to-back-to-back Cabo tournaments, including the Bisbee Los Cabos Offshore, the monster Black and Blue (with the $3 Million Plus winner), and then on to the WON Los Cabos Tuna Jackpot record-breaking extravaganza!


raceoutof
RACE OUT OF the Harbor with a mariachi band playing, water boats shooting water, and race entries dressed in costumes… got some great photos for my files.


In between a couple of the tournaments was a last-minute unraveling of an airline reservation in order for me to be in San Diego for the start of Baja HaHa Race. That was quite an unexpected treat. I was on the boat with some great folks including Port dignitaries and my good friend Ken Franke, SAC President, plus many others who were celebrating the kickoff, following the Race out of the Harbor with a mariachi band playing, water boats shooting water, and race entries dressed in costumes… got some great photos for my files.


This was followed by the Grand Opening of the Marina in Loreto over a weekend; quite an impressive marina with the most modern of docks with all the latest amenities capable of handling 200-foot yachts. In Loreto, I was staying at the Tripui Hotel in Puerto Escondido and originally had been scheduled to fly back to California from Loreto on Monday.


However, there was a last-minute invitation to go on a Gray Tag Research Satellite Tagging trip a few days later in Cabo San Lucas, and I didn’t want to miss it. Not only was there a lot going on, it was spread all over Baja Sur.


Since I needed to be in Cabo no later than Monday night, I cancelled my Loreto/San Diego flight and arranged to a hitch a ride to Cabo with Rene Olinger from her home in Loreto. She was to volunteer at the WON Tuna Jackpot in Cabo.


Unfortunately, her trip was delayed until Tuesday, so I decided to take a Tres Estrellas bus from Loreto to Cabo San Lucas. Since this was a new adventure for me, I went online and figured out the schedule and drove to the Bus Depot in Loreto, where I paid $51 for a ticket with an assigned seat on a bus departing on Monday morning at 8 a.m.


No sweat, problem solved.


My buddy, Capt. Patricia Miller Rains, co-author of Mexico Boating Guide, was also attending the Marina Puerto Escondido Grand Opening. She generously volunteered to follow me down at 6 a.m. on Monday morning to return my rental car and take me into town to catch my bus, but I assured her that I could drop the car off and catch a taxi into town.


Big mistake.


Monday morning, I was up at zero-dark-thirty, packed and headed for the airport. Going down the uneven, unlighted staircase, lugging a heavy suitcase plus my heavy backpack, I managed to miss the bottom stair – skinning both knees severely.


Picking myself, my suitcase and my backpack up, I drove to the Loreto Airport, arriving about 6 a.m. Everything was closed and the only person I could find was a gardener, a pleasant chap who spoke only Spanish. After a lengthy discussion, he assured me that a taxi would arrive soon. At 7 a.m., I asked him again. He swore that they would be there no later than 7:30, which was of some concern since I was estimating that I was 20 minutes from the Depot. At this point, I offered to pay him to drive me but he explained he couldn’t leave his work.


At 7:20 a.m., I decided that my only hope was to walk back out to Mex 1 and flag down the bus as it whizzed by. Off I went, skinned knees aching, doing double-time dragging my heavy bag and my backpack filled with camera equipment on my back.


I refused to allow myself to look at my cell to check the time; “Just keep walking,” became my mantra and I repeated it over and over as I plodded toward the main highway.


On a mission, I didn’t stop until I made it to Mex 1 about a mile from the airport at 8:05 a.m. There I positioned myself on the west side of the highway gazing north as traffic sped by.


My only hope was that I hadn’t missed the bus. After about 15 minutes of staring at each vehicle that approached, a shiny pickup slowed, and pulled off in front of me. I walked to the driver’s side as the tinted window rolled down; I was pleased to see that it was Ricky Trevor of “Outpost Charters.”


Trevor asked, “Do you need help?” Thanking him, I explained I was waiting for the bus. WOW! Fewer than 15 minutes had passed and someone I knew had stopped… impressive!


Several busses did pass by and I tried desperately to read the Destination signs hoping that the right one would stop and pick me up. Finally, one came over the rise with Cabo San Lucas as the destination.


I began waving frantically while edging closer to the side of the road tightly hanging onto my suitcase. The Greyhound-like bus slowed, pulled off the road and the door swung open. The driver hopped out, looked at my ticket and satisfied, motioned to the bay under the bus. He slung my heavy bag in and slammed the door, as I boarded. Breathing a sigh of relief, I realized I had made it!


As it turns out, the bus stops for anyone on the side of the road; they let people off anywhere -- at the gates in front of homes/farms/corrals. Plus, they stop at every Bus Terminal along the way. From La Paz down, it was standing room only. It was about 5:30 p.m. when I finally stepped off at the Bus Terminal in Cabo.


From there to my apartment, a short Uber-style ride, cost around $10, including tip.


A challenge that became an adventure – “Road Trekking” even without the Roadtrek van can be a blast!


So, until next time …


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Satellite tag deployed for 3rd year in a row off Cabo San Lucas
For the third year in a row, Pisces Sportfishing and Gray Fishtag Research have sponsored satellite tags to be deployed in billfish in the waters off of Los Cabos; I’ve had the honor of being invited on those three trips.

The “Finger Bank,” approximately 50 miles north of Land’s End on the Pacific side, has been the place to be for each of those years for the red-hot striper action that has established Cabo San Lucas as one of the most prolific billfish spots in the world.


thisyearthe
THIS YEAR THE large crew consisted of: up top Captain Libio Sandoval and below From L to R, Mate Juvencio “El Indio” Carlon; Carlos Narro — Biologist, Tracy Ehrenberg, Bill Dobbelaer, Gray Taxidermy, Tracy Ehrenberg, Pisces Group; Dave and Chet Bulthuis; Justin Poe - Vice President - Accurate Fishing Products; Darren-Biologist; Pamela Dobbelear, Gray Taxidermy; and Leah Baumwell, Gray Fishtag Research.


This year the large crew consisted of: up top Captain Libio Sandoval and below From L to R, Mate Juvencio “El Indio” Carlon; Carlos Narro — Biologist, Tracy Ehrenberg, Bill Dobbelaer, Gray Taxidermy, Tracy Ehrenberg, Pisces Group; Dave and Chet Bulthuis; Justin Poe - Vice President - Accurate Fishing Products; Darren-Biologist; Pamela Dobbelear, Gray Taxidermy; and Leah Baumwell, Gray Fishtag Research.


Aboard the fast 60-foot Hatteras, “Strictly Business,” that had been donated for the day by Victor Johansen, a lentil farmer from Montana, we rounded Cape Rocks reaching full cruising speed in flat calm seas as Captain Victor set a course for the Finger Bank.


Several hours later, the Captain spotted high-flying frigates on the horizon and steered the bow of the boat in their direction. Beyond them we could see a small fleet of trolling sports fishers.


In the cockpit it was all hands-on deck as lures were checked one final time, ready to be dropped back into the bubbling wake the moment the boat began to slow — which happened suddenly when two tailing striped marlin appeared off the port side.


The lure spread was set. It was only a few minutes later when a familiar quivering, sickle-shaped fin appeared behind the long port rigger line. Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz … the line disappeared from the reel and Tracy quickly snatched the bent rod from the rod holder as she headed for the chair; it was only a little after 9 a.m.


Tail-walking across the wake of the boat, the striper was frantic in his attempt to throw the hook and the green lure before sounding. Then he returned to the surface on the other side of the boat, fleeing from the boat. Gray Fishtag’s Leah Baumwell stood at the ready with her Aftco Tag Stick already loaded with the satellite tag.


thenthefeisty
THEN THE FEISTY fish swam away with its new payload that would provide incredible information needed to avoid any second guessing.


Carefully, the deckhand leadered the fish to the port corner which allowed Leah to place the tag, as cameras clicked to record the event. Then the feisty fish swam away with its new payload that would provide incredible information needed to avoid any second guessing.


Mission accomplished!


Next, the team took advantage of the volume of billfish in the area. The spread went back out, and it wasn’t long before the cry of “marlin in the spread” began in earnest and was heard and would continue to be heard for almost 3½ hours.


Justin Poe seized the opportunity to put the new Accurate Tern 500 through its paces with striped marlin. Proving the small reel not only had the chops for the stripers but much more.


After doing a great job deploying the satellite tag, Leah was eager to catch her first ever striped marlin which she managed after several false starts. By 1 p.m., Tracy, Justin, Leah, Chet, Darren, Pamela and Carlos had 11 bites, and placed tags in 8 of those fish … the sat tag went into the first one!


The tagged fish were given names that can be tracked on the Gray Fishtag website https://grayfishtagresearch.org/ . Those names were: Don Pedro Pisces (Sat Tag), Dillon,Leah, Fin, Rudolph, The Godfather, Kobilly and Emily.


Tracy Ehrenberg commented, “Pisces Sportfishing recently celebrated our 40th anniversary during which time nearly 700,000 people have fished with us.”


“The “satellite” and “spaghetti” tags provide incredible information needed in order that there is no second guessing; instead we have hard facts to educate visitors about the fishery, how to take care of it and provide jobs for years to come.”


Dobbelear, added, “Gray’s is celebrating thirty-plus years and Tracy Ehrenberg has been the leader for our company, as she has been for Cabo sportfishing in general when it comes to fishing and the fisheries in general. Pisces Sportfishing manages over 35 fishing boats here in Cabo San Lucas -- big ones, small ones, they have them all. They have a fishing report that comes out weekly which you can follow on their website www.piscessportfishing.com/ .”


The contribution by both Ehrenberg and Doebbler and their respective companies on behalf of the Baja Sur Fisheries underscores the vital importance of understanding the fisheries throughout Baja and beyond. The science and knowledge acquired is available to the Mexican Government agencies that are responsible.


Congratulations to Ehrenberg and Doebbler and others like them who recognize the need for this valuable information and who step up to help make a difference!


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Marina Puerto Escondido: A dream come true
The first time I saw Puerto Escondido was in 1969 on my very first trip to Ed Tabor’s Flying Sportsman’s Lodge in Loreto.

Those who had heard of the protected bay, surrounded by countryside even more rugged than that of other remote areas surrounding Loreto, whispered and even fantasized that maybe it was a dream back then. Regardless, for many years, slowly in fits and starts, the bay became well-known to boaters, either sailing or cruising the Sea of Cortez. It became well-known for its shallow depths as well as being an ideal anchorage to hide from the winter North Wind.


manyagreethat
MANY AGREE THAT Marina Puerto Escondido will be a game-changer for the area, allowing boaters access to a gateway offering some of the best the Sea of Cortez has to offer.


When I began driving Mex 1 with family and friends in 1973, it was one of our favorite stopping places – just a bay that someday would be developed.


However, it came with a rich history. Hernan Cortés, the namesake of the Sea of Cortez, sent his first ship to explore Baja California in search of pearls in 1533. Others followed in his wake and in 1940, John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts visited Puerto Escondido, inspiring Steinbeck’s classic novel, “The Log From the Sea of Cortez.”


Steinbeck wrote: "After noon we arrived at Puerto Escondido, the Hidden Harbor, a place of magic. If one wished to design a secret personal bay, one would probably build something like this little harbor... we went on a sheep hunt with Leopoldo Perpuly in the mountains in the back of the port... where a tiny stream of water fell hundreds of feet from pool to pool. There were palm trees and wild grapes and ferns, and the water was cool and sweet."


The first real attempt at development was 1976 when the Mexican Federal government agency, FONATUR (National Fund for the Promotion of Tourism) began to implement a Three Step Development Plan approved by SEMARNAT (Mexico's environmental ministry) in Loreto that included development at Puerto Escondido as a harbor with zoning and infrastructure for marina, hotels, restaurants, golf course, condominiums and private residences.


From 1977 through 1982, FONATUR dredged the Marina Puerto Escondido entrance channel, increasing the width and depth to support a marina; dredged and created two of the three planned artificial islands in the bay; constructed a protective ellipse with seawall and jetty, dug a well, built a water treatment plant and roads; built a marina, launching ramp and dry storage.


In 2007-2008, the Bank foreclosed on the island residential real estate, which some of the current Marina Puerto Escondido partnership directors then purchased.


Then, in 2016, Hamann Companies and Inmobiliaria JEP created a partnership, combining assets purchased from the Bank and FONATUR. This began their ownership and management of the harbor and real estate development at Marina Puerto Escondido.


During 2016-2017, the marina entrance channel was dredged to restore the original depth implemented at the time of construction by FONATUR.


By 2017, a partnership with Poralu Marine, Hamann Companies and Inmobiliaria JEP proceeded to install more than 80 state-of-the-art slips, after which they completed construction on the first Waicuri-model home, Casa Palo Blanco, featuring a 100-foot private dock.


This brings us to my visit last weekend, [Nov. 4] for the Grand Opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony during a fiesta and dinner for nearly 300 dignitaries, locals and visitors.


Throughout the day, until the festivities began at 5:30, guests were invited to examine the 100-plus slips, along with 100 mooring balls, breakwater, and all the premium services, amenities and stores that are now available at the marina.


After the tours, they enjoyed a meal served with an extensive selection of Baja wines and featuring authentic Mexican roasted pig that had turned on a spit for hours until the meat was falling off the bone.


Mariachis entertained before dinner and a Mexican Folkloric dance troupe entertained after the ribbon-cutting ceremony opened the marina.


Many agree that Marina Puerto Escondido will be a game-changer for the area, allowing boaters access to a gateway offering some of the best the Sea of Cortez has to offer – islands that are deserted and protected from north winds, snorkeling, sportfishing and an opportunity to explore with friends. For those without their own boats, there are several charter fishing boats already operating out of the marina, along with several cruising options for extended trips available.


Almost 50 years have passed since I first saw this remote bay. The once rugged, hidden anchorage now offers a dream marina, Marina Puerto Escondido — a dream come true that has definitely been worth the wait.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


History in the making
Last week, the overall winner of the 20th Annual Los Cabos Billfish Tournament was Team Sea Angel, scoring 1,700 points. Sea Angeldid not weigh in any fish, but thanks to their 28 striped marlin releases and one blue marlin release, they were able to hold onto the top spots in the Overall Team Division and Overall Release Points Jackpot. Plus, they won the Day Two Release Points Jackpot.

What most missed, according to Tracy Ehrenberg, is that this is the first time in the history of the LCBT that the winning team won without killing a fish. Now that’s a welcome accomplishment that would’ve put a smile on Don “Luis” Bulnes’s face, (father of Sportfishing in Cabo and advocate of release), if he were alive. We are all fortunate enough to be witnesses to something that has never been done before!


The team, consisting of Capt. Billy Chase “BC” Angel, Andrea Angel, Greg Angel, Austin Angel, Chase Travers, Fico Ortega and Juan Carlos Buenes, earned $113,500 for their efforts and an invitation to the 2019 Offshore World Championship in Costa Rica.


The Los Cabos Offshore Tournament, formerly referred to as the “Baby Bisbee,” made more history this week.


Equally significant, the LCOT had only 5 black and blue marlin brought to the scale out of a total 150 billfish hooked during the two-day event. Not one billfish was brought to the scale that didn’t meet the qualifying weight of 300-pounds. Somewhat of a record.


Added to that is the 145 billfish released in the two-day event.


Wayne Bisbee also noted. “Seven tournaments throughout the world have broken through the Million Dollar ceiling. We were the first to ever do it back in the ’90s. I remember standing on the stage and announcing that Bisbee Tournaments had done it!”


“Since then, a few tournaments have gone beyond that into the TWO, THREE and FOUR Million Dollar world.”


“However,” Bisbee announced, “the LCOT has achieved a payout of more than One Million Dollars making it the 8th tournament in the world to crack that Million Dollar ceiling !”


This historical event underscores the contributions made by Bob Bisbee Sr., patriarch of the Bisbee’s Black & Blue Tournament’s phenomena who passed away recently; and coincidently his Memorial and scattering of ashes were held the day after the event.


Some historical moments are personal or can be far reaching. However, they are always interesting to reflect on their impact personally or universally.


On a more personal level, we all have encountered some historical events of our own.


Some may be a “first” for you only that may or may not have any impact on others. Other times, it could be that unintentionally your actions are just a piece of a big picture and you don’t even realize when it’s happening.


The first time I traveled to Guaymas to fish for sailfish it was with my uncle and his buddies in a 16-foot Wizard boat. The drink of choice was beer and we camped out. At 16 years old, hearing their tales of the sails they had caught had me dreaming of seeing one, but more importantly, catching one. It is fair to say that the sail I caught that trip was more than I had dreamed it would be and it helped push me down the path to where I am today… hanging out with the big boys who are competing for millions of dollars. And getting to write their stories of their dreams.


Fast forward to a decade or so to the first time a couple of buddies and I climbed into a bare-bones Dodge Van with two bucket seats and a couple of folding chaise lounges (plus a cooler holding their beer and my wine) and off we went to explore the newly opened Mex 1 in 1973 and all that lay on either side. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions on the total impact that trip had on my life, but when you do, please include one self-contained RoadTrek Van and add the icing, my WON column, The Roadtrekker, which came about 30 years later.


Then at a party hosted by Galati Yachts a couple of nights ago celebrating the opening of their new offices overlooking the IGY Marina, I met one of Bob Healey’s, (CEO of Viking Yacht Company), grandsons, Justin Healey, who had just fished stripers on the Finger Bank for two days back-to-back and scored double-digit releases on both days!


Justin’s excitement couldn’t be contained as he gave me a blow by blow description of his battles during the LCOT.


Not only was this his first trip to Baja and Cabo San Lucas, but I think it’s safe to say this trip will be part of his history in the making. Watch out, Granddad! You have a fisherman following in your footsteps.


There are too many such events to list here, but a word of caution. Keep an eye out. There are plenty of these exciting events that one can literally be witness or party to that has never been done before.


Write it down, send it in. Share it with the rest of us.


illletyou
I’LL LET YOU draw your own conclusions on the total impact that trip had on my life, but when you do, please include one self-contained RoadTrek Van and add the icing, my WON column, The Roadtrekker, which came about 30 years later.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Baja Biosphere, bracelets, tuna pens and TIPs
Last weekend I attended the “Let’s Talk Hook-Up” live from the Sportfishing Association of California’s Open House in San Diego. I picked up some valuable information for Baja travelers, which I thought was worth passing on.

In December 2017, a Presidential Decree by Mexico’s President Enrique Peña Nieto established the Pacific Islands Biosphere Reserve, covering 2.7 million acres including 21 islands and 97 islets, plus all the surrounding marine areas.


decreerequires
THE DECREE REQUIRES that every individual on board a fishing vessel entering the Biosphere Reserve area (which includes the Coronado Islands, Todos Santos and San Martin Island) must purchase and wear a bracelet, effective immediately —whether they are fishing or not.


The decree requires that every individual on board a fishing vessel entering the Biosphere Reserve area (which includes the Coronado Islands, Todos Santos, and San Martin Island) must purchase and wear a bracelet, effective immediately — whether they are fishing or not.


The boundaries of the Biosphere reserve: N32 20.000' to N32 29.000', and W117 12.000' to W117 20.000'


Currently, the bracelets are available for purchase at $5 per bracelet per day at Fisherman’s Landing Tackle Shop, Point Loma Sportfishing Tackle Shop and the Dana Landing Market & Fuel Dock. Anglers will be required to provide boat name, boat owner’s name, number of passengers and dates in the reserve areas, but no other special IDs or info is necessary to purchase the bracelets.


While I’m on the subject of Coronado Islands, there are tuna pens around the Coronado Islands and in the northern Baja California waters. The tuna pen aquaculture is the farming of fish by enclosing tuna in man-made pens. These pens are cages that consist of large diameter flotation pipes that hold heavy-duty nets.


It has been discovered that the tuna pens often attract schools of free-roaming tuna. Although this appears to be a good opportunity for anglers to catch those tuna, CONAPESCA reminds all captains, anglers, and vessel owners that Mexico’s Sport Fishing Nom (NOM-017-PESC-1994) prohibits any recreational fishing activities within 250 meters (820 feet) from commercial fishing vessels, and fixed or floating fishing tackle in Mexican waters. This includes tuna pens! Violations will result in legal action taken against the vessel.


While this requirement has been enforced for a while, there may be some who aren’t aware of it.


Also, a reminder about “TIP” (Temporary Import Permit): From 0 to 12 miles from shore, a TIP is required; beyond 12 miles, it is not. The cost for the TIP that is good for 10 years is around $55 depending on inflation rate in the Mexican peso.


First, a Temporary Import Permit must be obtained. They are not expensive and can be obtained via the Mexican Consulate Office closest to you, at the border from the CIITEV unit in the Customs Office of entry or through this page on this Mexican Government link:

www.sportfishinginmexico.com/customs/


Documents required to obtain a TIP are:


1. Original current vessel documentation or registration that proves ownership;


2. Applicant’s ID (Passport);


3. For vessels registered under a Corporation or LLC, a notarized letter to authorize the vessel operation master operating it.


A word of caution, if a boat is purchased in Mexico and already has the permit, the TIP must be transferred or cancelled by the former owner.


The payment on the website may only be made via an international credit card in the name of the importer. Remember to call your bank or credit card company to inform them you plan to make an international transaction. These Temporary Import Permits are valid for 10 years from the effective date of the temporary importation of the vessel. A TIP can be renewed for another 10 years if the application is completed 45 days prior to the expiration of the past permit.


Once a TIP has been obtained for a vessel, some form of an FMM (Formato Migratoria Multiple) is needed for everyone on board. The most common immigration document for visitors is the Tourist Card, which can be easily obtained at the Point of Entry and costs $16 USD depending on the Mexican peso inflation rate. A tourist may also obtain an FMM via the SAC Website: www.californiasportfishing.org/fmm-visitor-form .


Along with the immigration document, the captain must report entering and exiting Mexico with a passenger list and copies of their individual immigration ­documents. If this is done online, both the passenger list and payment receipt must be e-mailed to: bc_pescade

portiva@inami.gob.mx


Applicants will receive an e-mail from National Immi­gration Institute (INM) either authorizing the trip or denying entry to a passenger intending to enter Mexico’s territorial water onboard the given vessel.


The authorizing e-mail should contain a National ­Immigration Institute (INM)’s permit to enter as a ­“Visitor without Permission to Perform Paid Activities.” The length of stay will cover the amount of time requested in the application yet shall not exceed 180 days, nor may it be used for multiple entries and departures.


A copy of this information will be sent to the Secretary of the Navy (SEMAR) and to the Secretary of ­Communications and Transportation (SCT.)


For further information call INFOSAT at:


Mexico Toll-Free: 01 800 4636728 options 7-2-2-1-1.


US Toll-Free: 1 877 4488728 options 7-2-2-1-1.


Finally, anyone on board must have a Mexican fishing license whether fishing or not; directions on how to purchase fishing licenses online can be found here along with the Mexican Fishing Regulations: www.sportfishinginmexico.com.


Although Mexico may be checking for documents and permits more than in the past, they have made it much easier to comply with these requirements with their online systems in English.


For more information about the Temporary Import Permit regulations, they are translated into English here. www.californiasportfishing.org/temporary-importation-permit .


In addition, fishing licenses are required by all persons aboard a vessel fishing in Mexican waters regardless of age. The Mexican Navy oversees enforcing regulations by randomly boarding vessels. A copy of the inspection report will be provided to captains upon request.


Inspections also enforce immigration requirements. Visit our “FMM Instructions” section and follow instructions to process a Migratory Form for each individual onboard. For questions, please contact the corresponding government office.

www.californiasportfishing.org/fmm-visitor-form


To be forewarned is to be forearmed….


Links to the Show


Sat., Oct 6, 2018 Let’s Talk Hook-Up Saturday 10/6/18 — Live from the Sportfishing Association of California Open House – 7-8 a.m. youtu.be/Qww8amU80Pk


Sat., Oct 6, 2018 Let’s Talk Hookup Saturday 10/6/18- Live from the Sportfishing Association of California Open House – 8-9 a.m. youtu.be/tc7eoRUHcDw


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


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