Umarex Gauntlet


CALIFORNIA'S ONLY SPORTSMAN'S NEWS SINCE 1953

Gary Graham – ROAD TREKKER



ROAD TREKKER /
WON News Column by Gary Graham

Gary Graham's published credits would fill many pages, two books on saltwater fly fishing, and hundreds of feature articles.

His  current leadership activities in the sportfishing community include: Avalon Tuna Club, member since the 1980s, San Diego Marlin Club, International Game Fish Association (IGFA), Baja California representative; Federation of Fly Fishers (FFF), certified fly casting instructor; Outdoor Writers of California, president; Outdoor Writers of America.

Gary Graham can be reached at: roadtrekker1@gmail.com

Baja whines and whispers
It’s been quite a while since I’ve flown into the Los Cabos Airport, as I have been flying into Loreto and using CBX for most of my trips the past year. Tuesday morning before I departed, in a last-minute conversation with Mark Rayor of JenWren Sportfishing, he had shared that one of his clients reported that there were Global Entry machines now located along the back wall in the immense room where immigration cleared arriving passengers in the Los Cabos Airport.

My Alaska flight from San Diego was a piece of cake, and smugly I marched at a fast pace to the hall, ignoring the line and headed toward the far wall where the Global Entry machines awaited. As I neared the machines, a uniformed agent waved me off. Thinking he believed I didn’t have the proper credentials, I waved my passport and Sentri card in his face.


itseemsas
IT SEEMS AS though some of the palapa roofs at Rancho Buena Vista Hotel had been replaced and one of the locals in the bar confirmed that the dining room had been reopened and had an excellent menu.

“Sorry, these machines are only for families with children to use,” he snarled, while pointing me back to the long line that snaked back and forth across the huge room.


Slowly, the long line melted and 45 minutes later I snatched my checked bag and headed for the next room where the melted line from the other room had reformed, only this time bearing their baggage. Each group paused at the counter, handed over their importation form, showed their passport and were directed to push the red button which in turn activated either a green (go) or red (go to secondary or x-ray).


So much for Global Entry machines …


Still with me? Everyone was directed to put their bags on a conveyor belt. Except for the fellow in front of me, who was directed to place his suitcases on the table; and I was instructed to do the same with my backpack.


Inside his bags, he had a drone and two cameras. The agent asked him the value of the drone, to which he responded $200. He was informed he would have to pay taxes on it. Then the agent turned to my bag and asked the same question. Apparently, since I possessed only two cameras and lenses which were legal, I went through with no additional taxes. Finally, I made it to my shuttle.


The shuttle driver – my friend Eduardo – quickly loaded my bags, and we headed for East Cape.


Quite chatty as always, he pointed out how dry the countryside was, adding there had been very little rain this summer. That is, until the past week, when it had poured around Miraflores. It showed as we approached the area; the brush along the road was already turning green.


When we passed the turnoff to La Ribera, Eduardo commented that the new Four Seasons Resort  was nearly finished, along with the golf course that Gary Barnes-Webb, the former manager at Rancho Leonero Hotel, was now supervising full time.


His next bombshell was that the Punta Colorado property had been sold to the former Governor of Baja Sur. He didn’t seem to have many details. However, when I mentioned the conversation to Mark Rayor later that evening, he confirmed that he had heard the same rumor, but wasn’t certain it was true.


Eduardo had still more. Did I know that they were remodeling Rancho Buena Vista?


Sixty rooms, he thought, adding that the dining room had also been reopened recently.


The next morning I checked in at Buena Vista Beach Resort, host for the Bisbee East Cape Offshore tournament later this week. I ran into Axel Valdez, owner/operator of the hotel and he explained how the event had been reduced to the same format as the Bisbee Los Cabos Offshore – it would now be two days of fishing on Friday and Saturday with the awards dinner on Sunday night. This would allow Cabo boats to fish the shortened event without having to fuel at East Cape — plus the schedule would be easier for the East Cape locals who would not require the entire week to be able to participate


Next, I headed to Rancho Buena Vista to confirm Eduardo’s information about the remodeling. It seems as though some of the palapa roofs had been replaced and one of the locals in the bar confirmed that the dining room had been reopened and had an excellent menu. The bartender added that there were now 43 rooms being rented on the weekends to Mexican families visiting from La Paz and Cabo San Lucas. It was often sold out.


I plan to track down more information between registration, weigh-ins, and awards at the ECO later this week.


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


ICAST – a field of dreams
It was the capper of another year, another 96-hour marathon of red-eye flights and, according to my fitness watch, 19.1 miles of walking around the ICAST show for two days in July while catching up with many friends and making some new ones.

It’s that “kid in a candy store time” when I reach my destination and the show doors finally open. There are so many new items that have popped up over the past year, and I’m eager to test them all.


imperiumoutfitters
IMPERIUM OUTFITTERS WAS one of the most intriguing booths that my friend Ryan Donavan of Redrum Sportfishing in Cabo insisted I visit.

Imperium Outfitters was one of the most intriguing booths that my friend Ryan Donavan of Redrum Sportfishing in Cabo insisted I visit. There, he introduced me to Robert Mergenthaler, president, and Russel Snipe, the tech guy.


The display consisted of various-sized trolling lure heads that had been created/printed during the show. Some were skirted. They were flanked on either side by a 3D Printer. As they explained, it was possible to replicate any lure head with their system, including old favorites that had become irreplaceable – a Godsend for some captains who had their own collection of old treasured lures that were now cracked and chipped.


Hobie Kayaks introduced a gamechanger for the kayak set – a new Mirage drive with 360-degree technology. I’ve been a Hobie Kayak fan since shortly after I began traveling in the Roadtrek when I was introduced to their inflatable.


The new Hobie MirageDrive 360 propulsion system is a 360-degree rotating pedal drive that allows anglers to easily maneuver their 2020 Mirage Pro Angler 360 12 and 14 fishing kayak in every direction – backwards, forward, sideways, diagonally – it can even spin on its own length. Upping the ante with all-new Kick-Up Fins that automatically retract upon impact, the new MirageDrive 360 delivers precision boat control and close-quarter maneuverability that’s unrivaled by any other human-powered watercraft. Anglers can go where they want and fish how they want with total control and complete confidence.


My buddies over at AFTCO also have been busy this year branching out with new products. According to Greg Stotesbury, Vice President, their new Saiko Pro is a 100-percent custom formula fluorocarbon featuring a supple, yet hard finish that provides better abrasion resistance; it also tests stronger after abrasion than other similar products. In 12- to 80-pound test, it’s available in both clear and pink; 100- to 300-pound test is available in clear. The knot and crimped strength of AFTCO's leader is unmatched, and the line promises to generate more bites from finicky tuna, billfish, and inshore species. I’m told that the new product will be available Aug. 1, just in time for the late summer and fall bites. They will also soon be introducing their own set of custom fish cleaning knives available sometime in September.


thismaterialis
THIS MATERIAL IS tough, resilient, and almost impervious to fish bites! Sebile delights in having an unsuspecting spectator grab hold of one end of the tail and pull with all their might.


Patrick Sebile was at the Band of Anglers booth demonstrating his “latest and greatest” lure designs. I have always found his lure designs fascinating remember the Sebile Magic Swimmer? However, his new Daartspin™ has its merits as well. First and foremost is the material it is made of “Hyperplastics™.”


This material is tough, resilient, and almost impervious to fish bites! Sebile delights in having an unsuspecting spectator grab hold of one end of the tail and pull with all their might. So far, I’ve never seen one break. Nor have I had one come back bitten in half – a real plus if you are fishing in remote parts of Baja, miles from any sort of tackle store.


The new design has a minnow-shaped body with a willow blade solidly embedded into its tail. It can be fished on a weedless hook, jighead, drop-shot rig, Carolina or Texas rig, or retrieved on top (or deep) with a circle hook through its nose. It offers a wide variety of action, depending on how it’s used.


Candace Fersch, who I met several years ago at WON Tuna Jackpot, insisted I couldn’t live without the Cuda Bait De-Hooker. This was another gadget that caught my eye that I must admit certainly seemed more practical than the butter knife that has always been my tool of choice for removing mackerel from a Sabiki or Lucky Joe bait rig.


Bill Pino of Squidnation, another WON Tuna Jackpot veteran, was also at ICAST displaying his latest dredges ( AKA Mud Flaps) equipped with new, tougher material that will not tear or shred.


Another Baja Buddy, Stephen Jansen, was displaying his “Cabo Killer” line of lures along with his hand-painted T-shirts designed himself and displayed the first time at ICAST.


I have so many extensive new product notes following two days at ICAST that it’s hard to choose my favorites. Remember, I walked nearly 10 miles a day, meaning there are a jillion or so more I can’t cover here. Perhaps another time.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Stars and Stripes - a miracle maker
The 23rd Annual Stars & Stripes Tournament in Cabo San Lucas, BCS, Mexico raised more than $3.7M for six nonprofits pioneering change for youth in Southern California and Mexico during its 2019 event. Always special, this feel-good event has been sold out each year; since 1997, supporters and guests gather for the four-day fishing and golf tournaments and music festival where over $33M has been raised — more than any other tournament of its kind — benefiting children’s and youth’s charities in Baja and the United States.

memorablemoments
MEMORABLE MOMENTS ARE many during the four-day event.

The Sportfishing Tournament began with U.S. Army retired Sergeant First Class Dana Bowman, a double amputee Special Forces Soldier and a member of the U.S. Army’s elite parachute team, the Golden Knights, dropped from a helicopter above and parachuted with the American Flag furling behind him, signifying the start of the day’s fishing.


Then Dick "Dicko" Gebhard, the Tournament Chairman fired a flare from the imaginary line at the front of the fleet as 30- to 72-foot boat engines roar to life and sped for the horizon.


Great weather and challenging fishing awaited the Chileno Bay-based Stars and Stripes Charity Tournament that hosted 48 teams this year. The first day, Friday, the fishing was tough as the teams scoured the local banks for billfish to tag and release or dorado, yellowfin tuna and wahoo to compete in the largest fish categories. Throughout the day calls come into Tournament Control in flurries; when “lines out” was declared, there were fish in all the divisions — multiple tag and release marlin, dorado, (with the largest weighing in at 23.9 pounds), lots of football-sized tuna and a 23-pound wahoo.


Aboard the “Yahoo,” team “Greek to the Max” was eager for their special guest angler, Col. Gregory D. Gadson, a retired Colonel in the United States Army and the former Garrison Commander of the U.S. Army, Fort Belvoir, also a double above-the-knee amputee. Gadson had served in the U.S. Army for more than 20 years as a field artillery officer and served on active duty for Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Operation Joint Forge, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was eager to catch his first billfish; however, as luck would have it, Friday was not to be his day, nor was it anyone else’s aboard.


afterdinnerthat
AFTER DINNER THAT evening, he briefly described his biggest challenge in Iraq to the audience – the day an IED attack led to the loss of his legs.


After dinner that evening, he briefly described his biggest challenge in Iraq to the audience — the day an IED attack led to the loss of his legs.


However, he is not allowing his devastating injuries to define his life. Instead, he is living his life as a portrait of courage in the face of great adversity. Gadson learned that hard work and determination are key factors in overcoming life-altering setbacks that for most might have been a defining moment.


However, he acknowledged, he refused to be defined by the proverbial “hail of bullets.” That comment moved the audience to a standing ovation as he closed.


The following morning, teams gathered for the final day’s sportfishing competition. Teams were ready to rumble, and as Bowman and the flag floated to earth, and the red flare sailed upward, the fleet again sped toward their own perceived “hot spot” where hopefully fish were lurking. By the sounds on the radio, it was indeed a different day. The hookup calls to Tournament Control were more frequent.


Gadson sat alert in his wheelchair gazing intently at the huge lures bubbling in the wake of the 42-foot “Yahoo.” Suddenly, so suddenly that it was only later that Gadson was able to replay the event back in his mind — a blur flashed behind the lure. A stout rod bent just before the howl of the clicker moved everyone into the cockpit to action, clearing rods while shouting encouragement to the angler.


Gadson was possessed as he clutched the rod with one hand and frantically reeled with the other. The leaping sailfish was also possessed as it greyhounded across the rolling sea. Soon the big fish that had snatched the lure was only a speck on the horizon. Turn by turn the line slowly came back onto the reel as Gadson cranked the struggling fish closer and closer to the boat. He pulled harder, and the billfish leaped high into the air, so close to the boat that the startled team members instinctively backed away from the transom. At last, the mate had the leader in hand and then grabbed the bill of the subdued sailfish. Quickly, the lit-up fish was lifted into Gadson’s lap for a couple of photos before the still lively fish was returned to its home in the water.


The ride back to the dock at Chileno Bay was a victorious one. Not only was this Gadson’s first billfish, as it turned out, it was the only sailfish caught during the two days. But the teams had found fair action during the two-day event, including 47 billfish, 15 dorado, 15 yellowfin tuna, and one wahoo.


The highest release boat was the “Picante 45” with four marlin tagged (and released) with Gray Fish Tags. The largest gamefish of the event was a yellowfin tuna caught aboard the “Caliente” weighing 30.5 pounds. Winners were awarded trophies, cash or donated items from the impressive list of sponsors of the two-day fishing event.


“Without the support of our generous community who attend the tournament year after year, Stars & Stripes would not be a success,” said Stars & Stripes Board Chairman Dicko Gebhard. “We’re grateful to our supporters who come back over and over and help us raise millions of dollars for worthy charities. They truly bring about miracles in the lives of youth.”


quicklylitup
QUICKLY, THE LIT-UP fish was lifted into Gadson’s lap for a couple of photos before the still lively fish was returned to its home in the water.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Oarfish sighting and release at East Cape
“The Thompson brothers – Noah, 24 and Jacob, 17 – from Austin, Texas, found, revived and released this juvenile oarfish off the lighthouse. It’s the first live oarfish release I know of and one of the best oarfish photos I’ve seen,” John Ireland, owner of Rancho Leonero Resort at East Cape acknowledged.

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“IT'S THE FIRST live oarfish release I know of and one of the best oarfish photos I’ve seen,” said John Ireland of Rancho Leonero.

This was a juvenile, only 8-feet long, but very light, weighing only five to 10 pounds, according to Jacob.


The first mention of the oarfish was in 1772 as a Regalecus glesne, according to Peter Ascanius, a Norwegian biologist, who had run across one not far from Norway's second largest city of Bergen.


Since then, the giant fish has been in the upper areas of the open ocean, following its food source; it is most prevalent in the tropics to middle latitudes and found from the surface down to 3,300 feet.


Its shape is ribbon-like, with a dorsal fin along its entire length from between its eyes to the tip of its tail. The fin rays are soft and can number 400 or more. At the head, the rays form a distinctive red crest. Its pectoral and pelvic fins are nearly adjacent. Its head is small with the protruded jaw; it has 40 to 58-gill rakers and no teeth.


The skin of the oarfish is scaleless, but covered with tubercles or small knobby nodules. The skin color is silver with streaks, spots or splotches of black or dark gray, and a bluish or brownish tinge on the head. Its fins, including its long dorsal fin and crest, are red, probably resulting from its diet.


It’s the world's longest bony fish, reaching a recorded length of 36 feet. The maximum recorded weight of a giant oarfish is 600 pounds. Unconfirmed specimens of up to 56 feet have been reported, although the average size is about 10 feet.


For whatever reason, oarfish seem to show up on Baja beaches every so often. There is a specimen nearly 20-feet long that has been hanging in the dining room at Buena Vista Beach Resort Hotel for decades.


“This oarfish washed up on the shore many years ago,” acknowledged Axel Valdez, Hotel Buena Vista Beach Resort manager. “My father had it mounted and hung it on the dining room wall.”


In 1996, a United States naval instructor discovered one that measured 21 feet on Silver Strand Beach in San Diego that apparently had died and washed ashore.


Because they are rarely seen, and because of their size, their elongated bodies and their appearance, many marine biologists believe the giant oarfish may be responsible for reports of sea serpent sightings over the years.


An 18-foot-long oarfish carcass was discovered Oct. 13, 2013 and was considered a once-in-a-lifetime event for beach goers on Catalina Island off Southern California at that time. That event was followed five days later by a second 14-foot-long oarfish, found on a beach in San Diego County. Then in August 2015, on Pebbly Beach near Avalon on Catalina Island, a 15.5-foot oarfish was found washed ashore with its tail severed, which the fish tend to do to shed weight and save energy. Because of its girth, it was guessed that it had likely been 24-feet long.


On September 1, 2007, in Isla San Marcos, B.C.S. Mexico, two oarfish were discovered swimming side by side along the beach.


The giant oarfish have been attributed with being an indicator of an “impending” or “recently occurring” earthquake and are sometimes known as "earthquake fish" because they are believed to appear before and after an earthquake.


They are known in Japan as “ryugu,” or “tsukai,” or "messenger from the sea god's palace," according to the Japan Times. Japanese fishermen discovered dozens of the deep-sea denizens around the time that a powerful 8.8-magnitude earthquake struck Chile in March, 2010.


Shortly before the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, about 20 oarfish stranded themselves on beaches in the area, according to Mark Benfield, a researcher at Louisiana State University.


Kiyoshi Wadatsumi, a specialist in ecological seismology, explained to the Japan Times that there could be a reason for the oarfish’s action. "Deep-sea fish living near the sea bottom are more sensitive to the movements of active faults than those near the surface of the sea."


On October 12, 2012, just after 10 a.m., a crowd of onlookers began to gather at a beach in Cabo San Lucas, BCS Mexico. They weren’t there to take in the tourists – they were looking at a strange sea creature that was making its way ashore. Once ashore, onlookers returned the oarfish to the water, but it didn’t last long. A panga from the Protected Areas Department came and took the dead fish away.


Over the years, there seems to have been many occasions where these unusual creatures have been washed ashore in Baja and many other areas. However, as Ireland observed, “The brothers found and revived the small juvenile oarfish, and in my 40 years here, it’s the first time that has ever happened.”


“The cool thing was that this specimen still had complete coloration. It was absolutely beautiful, one of the most stunning fish I’ve ever seen in terms of the iridescent coloration. It certainly looked like something that lives in thousands of feet of water and never sees the light of day. It was very cool,” Noah described the fish to “For the Win Outdoors.”


Noah added, “It took it a moment to be able to stabilize and hold itself upright. We watched for a couple minutes while it tried to make its way out and then we saw it disappear out towards some deeper water; hopefully, it got a lot more time ahead.


“Without a doubt, it was good to see it at least trying to make it towards deep water,” Noah continued.


The brothers didn’t catch any other fish that day, but that didn’t seem to matter to them at all.


“Understanding that not many people get to see those creatures while they’re still alive was much cooler than any other fish we could’ve caught with a fly rod,” Noah was quoted as saying by “For the Win Outdoors.”


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


IGFA Launches Passports to Fishing Kits in Baja
Last week I was invited to attend the 4th Annual Grand Gastronomic Fishing Tournament (Cuarto Gran Torneo de Pesca Gastronomico), which was held June 1 in conjunction with the city-wide celebration of the Seventh Festival Gastronomico de Almeja Chocolata. A “Let’s Talk Hookup” broadcast was scheduled for Saturday morning as well.

I joined the Sportfishing Association of California (SAC) team including Jeronimo De Silva, SAC Coordinator; Dan Malcolm, San Diego Port Commissioner; Rick Maxa, Let’s Talk Hookup Host along with Dallas Shackleton; and Sharon Cloward, President of San Diego Port Tenants Association.


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FRIDAY MORNING, 131 kids had signed up to compete. The weather was Baja’s best and the families enjoyed the day filled with occasional bites and an interesting assortment of rockfish, cabrilla and small grouper for the kids to pull on.

Recently, as part of its 80th Anniversary, the International Game Fish Association, (IGFA), announced a pledge to teach 100,000 kids from around the world to fish and they officially launched their new “Passports to Fishing Kits,” with hands-on tools to assist in reaching that goal.


The concept of Passports to Fishing is a system of clinics that is specifically designed for young anglers and their families, and it allows them to become acquainted with sportfishing as they bond with others in their community who share a similar interest.


Upon registering, participants receive an IGFA “Passport.” Then each child visits the various stations where he or she learns the basics on tackle, knot tying, conservation, casting, safety, as well as the importance of protecting and conserving the resources for future generations.


Their Passports are stamped as they complete each station and once all stations have been completed successfully, each child receives a rod and reel to use for the day and is free to fish under the supervision of the trained staff and volunteers.


As an IGFA Rep for Baja, I wanted to be certain that the kids in Baja were part of these clinics. So, with the help of my friend Clicerio Mercado, an organizer of tournaments in Cabo San Lucas, we had the Passport Kits shipped and delivered to Gonzalo Alamea Camacho, coordinator of all of the SEPADA sports fishing tournament series, no-frills tournaments for families as well as coordinator for Fonmar. It was Gonzalo who picked us up at the airport in Loreto when we arrived.


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LATER THAT EVENING at the Registration for the 4th Annual Grand Gastronomic Fishing Tournament, prizes were awarded for the largest fish in all the different age categories.


As we drove into town, to my surprise, Gonzalo explained that the Passport Kit arrived in time to implement the clinic as part of the festivities, and just before the Gran Tournament. So, he was able to organize the Kid’s event along with the clinic at the Tournament, kicking off the International Game Fish Association’s Passport to the sportfishing program in Baja — the first of its kind to be used in Baja.


By the time we arrived, the clinic was already underway!


After depositing my bags in my spacious room at La Misión Hotel on the Malecon overlooking the sparkling Sea of Cortez, I grabbed my camera, and fast-paced it a few blocks to where the clinic was taking place near the Marina.


The Palapa-covered meeting area was decorated with IGFA and Children’s Clinic banners in Spanish. Both kids and parents were paying close attention to the local Captains who had volunteered to crew the different stations which had fishing rods and other paraphernalia piled high. Kids of all ages surrounded the Captains, eager to hear the lessons being presented.


Gonzalo, clutching his microphone, taught a long line of kids one-by-one on how to dehook a fish using a rubber halibut to demonstrate the technique.


Laughter, cheers, and screeches filled the air as the kids moved from station to station having their passports stamped when the lesson was completed while proud parents with cellphones in hand photographed the moment. Lines threaded through the guides of the brand-new sparkling fishing rods and reels. Knot- tying was demonstrated inside and outside on the beach, there were casting lessons. By the end of the evening, 85 children had completed all the lessons and were prepared for the next day’s fishing, which was for the entire family on the jetty surrounding the marina.


palapacovered
THE PALAPA-COVERED meeting area was decorated with IGFA and Children’s Clinic banners in Spanish.


Friday morning, 131 kids had signed up to compete. The weather was Baja’s best and the families enjoyed the day filled with occasional bites and an interesting assortment of rockfish, cabrilla and small grouper for the kids to pull on.


Later that evening at the Registration for the 4th Annual Grand Gastronomic Fishing Tournament, prizes were awarded for the largest fish in all the different age categories.


Gonzalo, the volunteer Captains, and all the other volunteers praised the Kit, commenting that the information that was included — the lesson plans, the you-tube videos, and the ample signing and banners — all were a tremendous help.


Underscoring the effectiveness of the Passport Kit was the fact that Gonzalo plans to include the Kids Clinic and Tournaments in all of the Dos Mares events planned for the upcoming year.


One Captain speaking for the entire group added, “We all had a great time teaching, and the kids seemed to have as much fun learning!”


“Children are the key to the future of recreational angling. It's vitally important that we get them out on the water and teach them how to be ethical and responsible anglers at a young age,” said IGFA President Nehl Horton.


In recognition of its 80th anniversary, IGFA announced plans for the inaugural IGFA Day on June 7, 2019, to celebrate recreational angling and galvanize its international network of supporters around the world.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


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