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CALIFORNIA'S ONLY SPORTSMAN'S NEWS SINCE 1953

Gary Graham – ROAD TREKKER



ROAD TREKKER /
WON News Column by Gary Graham

Gary Graham's published credits would fill many pages, two books on saltwater fly fishing, and hundreds of feature articles.

His  current leadership activities in the sportfishing community include: Avalon Tuna Club, member since the 1980s, San Diego Marlin Club, International Game Fish Association (IGFA), Baja California representative; Federation of Fly Fishers (FFF), certified fly casting instructor; Outdoor Writers of California, president; Outdoor Writers of America.

Gary Graham can be reached at: roadtrekker1@gmail.com

IGFA Launches Passports to Fishing Kits in Baja
Last week I was invited to attend the 4th Annual Grand Gastronomic Fishing Tournament (Cuarto Gran Torneo de Pesca Gastronomico), which was held June 1 in conjunction with the city-wide celebration of the Seventh Festival Gastronomico de Almeja Chocolata. A “Let’s Talk Hookup” broadcast was scheduled for Saturday morning as well.

I joined the Sportfishing Association of California (SAC) team including Jeronimo De Silva, SAC Coordinator; Dan Malcolm, San Diego Port Commissioner; Rick Maxa, Let’s Talk Hookup Host along with Dallas Shackleton; and Sharon Cloward, President of San Diego Port Tenants Association.


fridaymorning
FRIDAY MORNING, 131 kids had signed up to compete. The weather was Baja’s best and the families enjoyed the day filled with occasional bites and an interesting assortment of rockfish, cabrilla and small grouper for the kids to pull on.

Recently, as part of its 80th Anniversary, the International Game Fish Association, (IGFA), announced a pledge to teach 100,000 kids from around the world to fish and they officially launched their new “Passports to Fishing Kits,” with hands-on tools to assist in reaching that goal.


The concept of Passports to Fishing is a system of clinics that is specifically designed for young anglers and their families, and it allows them to become acquainted with sportfishing as they bond with others in their community who share a similar interest.


Upon registering, participants receive an IGFA “Passport.” Then each child visits the various stations where he or she learns the basics on tackle, knot tying, conservation, casting, safety, as well as the importance of protecting and conserving the resources for future generations.


Their Passports are stamped as they complete each station and once all stations have been completed successfully, each child receives a rod and reel to use for the day and is free to fish under the supervision of the trained staff and volunteers.


As an IGFA Rep for Baja, I wanted to be certain that the kids in Baja were part of these clinics. So, with the help of my friend Clicerio Mercado, an organizer of tournaments in Cabo San Lucas, we had the Passport Kits shipped and delivered to Gonzalo Alamea Camacho, coordinator of all of the SEPADA sports fishing tournament series, no-frills tournaments for families as well as coordinator for Fonmar. It was Gonzalo who picked us up at the airport in Loreto when we arrived.


laterthatevening
LATER THAT EVENING at the Registration for the 4th Annual Grand Gastronomic Fishing Tournament, prizes were awarded for the largest fish in all the different age categories.


As we drove into town, to my surprise, Gonzalo explained that the Passport Kit arrived in time to implement the clinic as part of the festivities, and just before the Gran Tournament. So, he was able to organize the Kid’s event along with the clinic at the Tournament, kicking off the International Game Fish Association’s Passport to the sportfishing program in Baja — the first of its kind to be used in Baja.


By the time we arrived, the clinic was already underway!


After depositing my bags in my spacious room at La Misión Hotel on the Malecon overlooking the sparkling Sea of Cortez, I grabbed my camera, and fast-paced it a few blocks to where the clinic was taking place near the Marina.


The Palapa-covered meeting area was decorated with IGFA and Children’s Clinic banners in Spanish. Both kids and parents were paying close attention to the local Captains who had volunteered to crew the different stations which had fishing rods and other paraphernalia piled high. Kids of all ages surrounded the Captains, eager to hear the lessons being presented.


Gonzalo, clutching his microphone, taught a long line of kids one-by-one on how to dehook a fish using a rubber halibut to demonstrate the technique.


Laughter, cheers, and screeches filled the air as the kids moved from station to station having their passports stamped when the lesson was completed while proud parents with cellphones in hand photographed the moment. Lines threaded through the guides of the brand-new sparkling fishing rods and reels. Knot- tying was demonstrated inside and outside on the beach, there were casting lessons. By the end of the evening, 85 children had completed all the lessons and were prepared for the next day’s fishing, which was for the entire family on the jetty surrounding the marina.


palapacovered
THE PALAPA-COVERED meeting area was decorated with IGFA and Children’s Clinic banners in Spanish.


Friday morning, 131 kids had signed up to compete. The weather was Baja’s best and the families enjoyed the day filled with occasional bites and an interesting assortment of rockfish, cabrilla and small grouper for the kids to pull on.


Later that evening at the Registration for the 4th Annual Grand Gastronomic Fishing Tournament, prizes were awarded for the largest fish in all the different age categories.


Gonzalo, the volunteer Captains, and all the other volunteers praised the Kit, commenting that the information that was included — the lesson plans, the you-tube videos, and the ample signing and banners — all were a tremendous help.


Underscoring the effectiveness of the Passport Kit was the fact that Gonzalo plans to include the Kids Clinic and Tournaments in all of the Dos Mares events planned for the upcoming year.


One Captain speaking for the entire group added, “We all had a great time teaching, and the kids seemed to have as much fun learning!”


“Children are the key to the future of recreational angling. It's vitally important that we get them out on the water and teach them how to be ethical and responsible anglers at a young age,” said IGFA President Nehl Horton.


In recognition of its 80th anniversary, IGFA announced plans for the inaugural IGFA Day on June 7, 2019, to celebrate recreational angling and galvanize its international network of supporters around the world.


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Fish Tales Validated at Inaugural Tournament
Loreto’s reputation as a dorado and yellowtail destination stretches back to fifties when Ed Tabor, a successful businessman, cashed out in the United States and purchased a property overlooking the Sea of Cortez. Complete with a bar and restaurant that served international cuisine, it was also equipped with air conditioning, heating, a well, and a swimming pool.

Tabor added a flotilla of sportfishing boats outfitted with fishing and diving gear, and over the years the summer dorado and winter yellowtail were the mainstay of a growing sportfishing community, consisting mostly of pangas.


Anglers in search of exciting fishing in exotic destinations flocked to Loreto. For many years the seasonal fishery continued to draw them to the area.


enriquesalcedo
ENRIQUE SALCEDO, Marina Manager, Robert Ross with Tag Team, Owner John Sercu as he accepts his teams awards for highest release boat of the tournament.


Fathers, sons and in some cases, grandsons, enjoyed the fishing trips that became part of their family’s folklore.


As the dorado and yellowtail became scarcer and smaller, enterprising local pangueros filled the gaps with billfish, wahoo, roosterfish, sierra and the many others in the rocky reefs during the different seasons – all of which were within range of the fleet of pangas – the ubiquitous open boats powered by outboards.


Then the pangas and the motors grew larger, which allowed some adventurous captains and anglers to venture farther offshore. However, many were limited by the number of clients who visited the area as well as by the winter’s prevailing north winds. And most were not able to afford exploratory trips unless they had paying clients.


Over the past several decades, more and more visitors found the entire region appealing and settled in the area. Stories of huge marlin, swordfish and yellowfin tuna flowed.


In November of 2011, one of my “Road Trekker” columns “ Connecting the Dots,” filled in some of the blanks on a report that surfaced in 2010 from the Loreto area. In that column, I wrote about the 350-pound swordfish, four striped marlin, two sailfish, one Mako shark, and fifteen dorado – all caught by Robert Ross and his crew out in the middle of the Sea of Cortez in an area referred to as “The Canyon.”


In 2016, Ross and company caught a 430-pound yellowfin tuna, and then in 2018, Pat McDonell wrote in his Baja Fishing Report about additional huge tuna – some caught, and others lost in the Loreto area. And surprise, surprise! Once again, Robert Ross and his team were central to the story.


Ross, son of Doc Ross, the well-known boat mechanic from early Cabo San Lucas days long before the marina was built, first found San Cosme nearly two decades ago. He began construction of his home there several years later.


Today, the sprawling Mexican home spills down the side of the mountain to a small marina that he has built. From that location, he has spent the years fishing the surrounding area, all the while gaining a remarkable knowledge of the extraordinary fishery it contains.


Speaking with the voice of authority earned by his years exploring the prolific waters that are his front yard, it is no wonder that the owners of the Marina Puerto Escondido honored him by naming their new sportfishing event for him.


Leading up to “The Robert Ross Fishing Tournament ,” locals and observers alike seem to doubt its success – many suggesting that fishing was slow this year and that attendance would be low.


Twenty-five teams, locals as well as from mainland Mexico, Cabo San Lucas, and La Paz defied the rumors and participated in the inaugural event.


The first tournament day was no bonanza, but there were dorado and yellowtail. There were also a handful of striped and blue marlin and a few sailfish released as some of the fleet labored to find the packs of billfish seen on the previous pre-fish day.


The second day, they found the billfish – and they were hungry! According to Ross, the two-day total for the eight boats targeting billfish was 136 marlin and sailfish released!


The large number seemed to indicate that although no yellowfin showed up for the party, the billfish show underscored the remarkable challenges at the fishery that is awaiting anglers at the “Canyon.”


And the inaugural Robert Ross Fishing Tournament at the new Marina Puerto Escondido got off to a great start!


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Rooster Fever
As Baja 2019 has unfolded, the roosterfish action has become more and more impressive. For the past month and a half, both size and quantity have been extraordinary. Anglers using both fly and conventional tackle from the beaches as well as fishing aboard pangas, from Muertos Bay and East Cape to Cabo and up on the Pacific side, have been bringing in some trophy-sized fish.

In the early ’70s on my first road trip to Baja, after camping with my friends on different beaches along the way, when we reached Rancho Buena Vista Hotel, we pooled our cash and rented a room for the night. Although there was a lot to like about the iconic hotel made famous by Ray Cannon in his Western Outdoor News column, on that night, the hot showers were the most welcome and memorable.


whoeversaid
WHOEVER SAID DIAMONDS are a girl’s best friend... “I’ve never been fishing for roosters…” - Cortney Brown


The next morning, we sat at the long tables in the dining room that were built to accommodate family-style meals. As luck would have it, Chuck Walters, one of the owners, sat at our table. After introductions were over and we described our trip thus far, we asked the obvious question. “How’s fishing?”


Walters excitedly described the wide-open sierra bite that the guests were enjoying on the boats.


We explained that we were more interested in fishing from shore. At that point, he abruptly arose, picked up a spinning rod I hadn’t noticed, and purposefully headed out the door, across the porch to the beach, where he energetically flung the chrome lure at the end of his line into the Sea of Cortez. Of course, the three of us had trailed along after him, chatting as he made cast after cast.


Halfway through the retrieve on one cast, a strange-looking dorsal fin appeared. Walters set the hook on the first roosterfish I had ever seen! While it wasn’t huge, the pugnacious rooster fought as Walters muscled it to the shore and then released it.


Thus, began my fascination with the roosterfish that prowled the Baja beaches in search of food.


For those of you who have roosters on your bucket list, now is the time to consider a quick trip to Baja to tick that box!


“Roosters are so unpredictable, whether you are trying from a boat or shore. Everything has to come together. They bust the surface and most often disappear. Is it a wonder that fishing for them is so addictive? -Gary Bulla, Flyfishing Adventures


Bulla’s groups fishing large anchovy-like flies have scored on trophy-sized roosters at Muertos Bay since mid-April and his reports are filled with consistent catches of roosters, as well as a few other surprises – like a wahoo on the fly.


“This is the first time we have landed wahoo on the fly here that I have witnessed, and I am looking forward to it happening again,” Bulla grinned.


Farther down the coast at East Cape, there seems to be a similar number of roosters cruising the beaches. While there have been glowing reports of “personal best” roosters for several dedicated anglers, there are also reports of beaches crowded with competing anglers.


The 30 miles of rugged beach stretching along Baja's East Cape down the Sea of Cortez are deceptively beautiful until you realize this beach is an insurmountable barrier with unthinkable obstacles that are seemingly designed to protect, or at least level, the playing field for its most sought-after quarry – the roosterfish.


Large roosterfish, or in Spanish, pez gallo, is the prime beach target on any tackle. They are often oblivious to any offering, which makes even the refusals memorable. Their “takes” demand a checklist of do's and don'ts. Even for the most seasoned anglers, let alone for a novice, this is daunting.


At times, roosters will be well beyond casting distance, feeding on a bait school which will charge the shoreline providing the angler the opportunity for a good presentation. When roosters are in full-feeding mode, they are far more apt to make aggressive moves on the presentation.


With the bright Baja sun overhead, East Cape beaches seem almost like flats fishing for permit or giant trevally. Many believe the best time to fish roosters is from mid-morning until mid-afternoon. Spotting “grandes” betrayed by their shadows on the bottom is sight casting at its finest with any tackle.


Techniques vary. Finding schools of bait along the shoreline, then sitting high on the berm, is an easy way to spot incoming roosters.


For the more athletic, racing up and down the beach to crashing fish can be productive and great fun, but it is also exhausting and can be frustrating! Like hunting, it is important to be in position and ready when the opportunity arises. But getting on the fish and hooked up is worth it.


Blind casting is a low-percentage effort. Big roosters are on the move all the time. So blind casting is hit or miss at best. Can it happen? Of course it can. It's just not the wisest way to spend your time.


Catching the large roosters requires reacting to each fish as an individual experience. Some come in hot and fast, others slow and deliberate, and still others change their energy level mid-retrieve. Anglers must adapt their retrieve speed to keep a fish hot and focused on the fly or lure. Remember: take your time — don't rush the fish!


If your “Rooster Fever” is an itch that needs to be scratched, the 2019 Baja season is more than likely your opportunity for lots of chances at larger-than-usual roosterfish.


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We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


Don’t know Jack?
“Gary, have you ever tried to explain that amberjacks are extremely rare in Baja? All the fish being identified as amberjacks recently are really Almaco jacks,” Steve Crooke texted.

Retired from the California Department of Fish and Game after 38 years, Crooke had been involved with the live bait fleet (commercial mackerel/sardine fleet), the rockfish life history program, Ocean Resources Enhancement and Hatchery Program and recreational angler catch program; he also co-chaired the Highly Migratory Species Plan Development Team for the Pacific Fishery Management Council.


oncethefly
ONCE THE FLY reached the bottom, two or three abrupt strips would usually produce a strike, resulting in an intense battle on the 14-weight fly rod and a cherished photo-op for the excited angler.


Currently, he is the Scientific Adviser for the Sportfishing Association of California (SAC), providing biological assistance for both state and federally managed fisheries, and he is my “go-to” guy whenever I have a marine life question. He has never steered me wrong.


His recent question reminded me of my first encounter with the Almaco jack.


In the late ’80s, Greg, our oldest son, was working aboard the sportfisher War Eagle, owned by Bob and Diana Hampton. They were planning a trip to Revillagigedo Archipelago, about 250 miles south of Cabo San Lucas, four islands of volcanic origin: Socorro, Clarion, San Benedicto and Roca Partida.


Yvonne and I were invited to tag along, and a few weeks later we were trolling down-swell, south, aboard their Hatteras. Our trip was punctuated by frequent billfish, dorado and yellowfin tuna strikes during the day.


As we often did on these ventures, Yvonne and I volunteered to take the “graveyard watch” to enjoy the solitude and the extraordinary star-filled sky together.


As the islands in the distance came into view, the wahoo bite was astonishing. Multiple strikes repeatedly stopped us. It was crazy! By the time we neared the island chain, we were limited out; the fish hold, the on-deck freezers, as well as the ice chests, were plugged with wahoo filets.


You’ve heard of fish jumping in the boat? If a spinning rod with a free-swinging lure was left dangling in one of the rod holders, a wahoo literally impaled itself on it as it leaped 10 feet in the air.


One afternoon, we anchored in the bay near the naval station in about 60 feet of water. As dusk turned to dark after dinner, I pinned on a caballito and dropped it down to the bottom. Within minutes, I was hooked up to something solid and stubborn. It wouldn’t budge. One by one everyone went to bed, and throughout the night I continued my battle alone struggling with many unknown adversaries who either managed to rock me or break off without ever showing themselves.


followingalmaco
THE FOLLOWING ALMACO Jack, Seriola rivoliana were caught at East Cape, Baja California Sur, Mexico: Note the stripe through the eye on this freshly-caught fish.


My frustration spawned determination, and finally, shortly after dawn, I brought an Almaco jack to the boat on its side.


I awakened Greg, sleeping on the bridge, who gaffed the 30- to 40-pound fish for me.


According to Crooke, the easiest way to differentiate between the two species of fish is by the height of the dorsal fin, which is twice as high, and the number of gill rakers on the Almaco jack. The first is easy and so is the second if you can count. If there are 18 or 19 gill rakers, use the dorsal fin method to be certain.


Almaco jacks are much more robust, shorter and stockier in the body, plus they feature a dark bar that extends through the eye to the base of the dorsal. The few amberjack Crooke has seen traveled down the Mexican coast and to the south. He did count a few gill rakers to be sure.


My next encounter with Almaco jacks, in quantity, was several years ago at East Cape on a ridge approximately 70 feet deep below Los Frailes.


Visiting fly fishers were finding it difficult to cast the heavy tackle trying to land these brutes that had gathered along the ridge.


As their guides who were familiar with the area, we instructed them that the heavier tackle was needed to land these fish.


Instead of making long casts, we had them cast as far as they could and then shake out the rest of the weighted fly line. Once the fly reached the bottom, two or three abrupt strips would usually produce a strike, resulting in an intense battle on the 14-weight fly rod and a cherished photo-op for the excited angler.


Seldom targeted, the Amalco jack has seemed to make a resurgence this season already. And now that Crooke has helped straighten out the name thing, you will know Jack when you catch one!


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


It’s all about the kids
Robert Burns in his poem To a Mouse said, “The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry. No matter how carefully a project is planned, something may still go wrong …”

And no matter how hard we tried, our recent trip did just that!


Don Dingman, whose passion is fishing and the future of the kids, and I met at the Gray FishTag symposium in Ft. Lauderdale last December and realized we had a common goal — helping kids.


hissonalan
HIS SON ALAN loves to fish and to underscore that fact, Jansen sent me a photo of him holding a huge snook caught from the beach.


In mid-March, the following message popped up from Dingman: “I keep running past your card… ‘It’s all about the kids’ and since this is pretty much everything we do, is there any way I can help with Stars and Stripes Tournament?


“Unfortunately, I can’t make the dates this year. It falls after an event we do in Jacksonville, Florida where ‘It’s all about the kids’ as well. We could shoot a Hook the Future episode with you and a couple of kids to promote the tournament and the cause sometime in the future.


“If you can get a boat and a couple of English-speaking Mexican kids, we can get the crew to Cabo. The show currently airs on the Sportsman Channel, World Fishing Net­work and Fox Sports South, and is available to over 110 million households!”


The Stars and Stripes Tour­nament is scheduled for late June; Dingman only had a possible short window in mid-April. Disappointed, we agreed to try to do something in 2020.


After hanging up the telephone, I began making calls and texting folks who I thought might be able to help us put together a fishing trip for two Mexican junior anglers on such short notice.


My friend Jorge Tellez, owner of Gaviota Sportfishing Fleet with his brother and partner Sergio, responded; it was a resounding “Yesssss!” And we went to work. His employer, Solmar Properties, volunteered rooms for the film crew and staff, and he and Sergio donated Solmar 1, a 33-foot Crystaliner for two days.


Reservations were put in place for the flight, room, and boat on April 9-13 for Dingman and his crew.


Now for the stars, our local junior anglers.


I contacted my friend Stephen Jansen, owner of Jansen Inshore Tackle in Cabo San Lucas, who is involved with a local Rotary Club’s children’s beach tournament in Cabo. Jansen located Oswaldo Ortega, who worked on one of the larger sportfishers. His son Alan loved to fish and to underscore that fact, Jansen sent me a photo of him holding a huge snook caught from the beach.


bothboyscertainly
BOTH BOYS CERTAINLY proved, that like their fathers, they were not strangers to fishing as they reeled in Lucky Joes, five mackerel at time and helped each other removing them into the live well.


I contacted Oswaldo (nicknamed Baleen), who worked with Captain Greg Distefano aboard El Suertudo. I had met Baleen at a party where Distefano was named International Captain of the Year by the publication In the Bite where Baleen was honored as well. He gave permission for Alan to be part of the trip.


Then, Captain Mark Rayor, Team Jen Wren out of East Cape, responded that one of his captain’s sons, Ervis Romero, could fish the two days. After receiving permission from his father Diego Romero, the boys Alan and Ervis were our stars.


Day One: The grumpy Pacific had been stirred up by three days of strong southwest wind and the uphill ride was not what we had hoped for, but our young stars were seasoned troopers and didn’t complain.


When we arrived at our destination, the word was out. “Golden Gate” was clearly the place to be. A large fleet of sportfishers milled about among the bait balls.


Frigate birds circled above the nearly football field-wide bait balls as they were chased to the surface by voracious predators. The boys proved they were not strangers to fishing, reeling in Lucky Joes — five mackerel at time — and helped each other dump them into the live well with some of the fattest mackerel we had seen in awhile.


The fleet slowly diminished, boats heading one-by-one in different directions. Soon, all that was left were a few smaller Cabo charters along with an 80-foot Weaver, the “El Suertudo,” the boat that Alan’s father worked on. Not far from us, they connected with a striped marlin and we watched as they quickly fought and released it.


fortheboys
FOR THE BOYS and for that matter the “Hooked for Life” crew that was the highlight of the trip providing the best “photo-ops” of the trip.


Although we saw a few stripers, we had only one bite on a tailer as we pointed the boat down-swell toward home. Laughingly, Dingman asked Captain Javier if there were any bananas on board?


But, tomorrow is another day and as they say; “It’s not over until the Fat Lady sings!” We did not hear her warming up in the background.


The final day brought a much calmer sea and promises of much closer yellowfin tuna and striped marlin greeted us. We doubled our order of mackerel and cabillito in anticipation of yellowfin and marlin charging the boat!


However, the sea temps had dropped several degrees and was off-color from currents sweeping down the Baja coast. As hard as Captain Javier and his mate Irving tried, all we could come up with was one quick marlin follow.


We had struck out for the second day in a row. We heard the Fat Lady!


As Dingman left the boat, he thanked the captain for all his efforts and asked, “Are you certain there are no bananas hidden below deck?”


Our “stars” were old hands at this, and if they were disappointed, they didn’t show it.


To liven things up, the real of the trip introduced himself. “Pancho” or a Pancho imposter, is a sea lion that has been a local legend in the IGY Marina for many years. It is the official greeter for sportfishers, meeting them at the Harbor Channel entrance as they dump unused bait while idling to their respective slips.


Pancho has become more aggressive and now climbs on the boats’ swim platforms and begs for the squirming discarded baitfish.


He or she has learned to sit up over the covering board — a crowd pleaser that quickly became a must-see photo-op for anglers and tourists alike.


For the boys, and for that matter the “Hooked for Life” crew, that was the highlight of the trip and best photo-ops of the two days… a reminder that even the best laid plans are not written in stone.


* * *

We hope you enjoyed this article on our no-charge website wonews.com. Of course, this site contains only a small fraction of the stories that Western Outdoor Publications produces each week in its two northern and southern editions and its special supplements. You can subscribe to the print issue that is mailed weekly and includes the easy flip-page full-color digital issues, or you can purchase a digital only subscription. Click here to see the choice.


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